Smallbeach tub wagons

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

Moderator: GnATTERbox Moderators

User avatar
Steve Holland
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 149
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2013 8:31 pm
Location: Birmingham, UK
Interests: Narrow gauge railways (WHR and FR in particular), Gn15, 16mm/ft, 7mm/ft, too much going on in life to have a website to look after!

Smallbeach tub wagons

Postby Steve Holland » Thu Oct 16, 2014 8:49 pm

The wagon fleet for Smallbeach has been growing. I have recently made a couple of wooden bodied tubs as a bit of variety from the metal ones.

Image

The bottle has some home brewed wood weathering solution made up of a (used) scouring pad dissolved to rust using vinegar, with the resulting powder put in to isopropyl alcohol. This is what the 'glop' does to the wooden parts.

Image

Axleboxes were inspired by the ones fitted to the Sand Hutton wagons, cobbled up from Evergreen styrene strip, with Hornby coach wheels.
Nuts and bolts are from EDM Models, and are really intended for O scale but the bigger ones work really well in 1:24.
For some reason that I have not been able to work out the ends are not as high as the sides, but they were made from the same strip wood!

Image

Each end on both wagons needed a strip adding to make up the height.
In a first for the Smallbeach wagon fleet the wooden wagons have actually had an initial coat of paint added.

Image

The green one should really be a darker grey than the grey one, as I used a colour called Field Grey. Couplings plus further grot and rust will be added, and I promise that I will paint the other wagons - just don't hold your breath waiting. :lol:
The photo below is a comparison of the wooden tubs with one of Steve Bennett's resin kits and one of my scratch built steel bodied tubs.

Image
Steve Holland

Keep banging the rocks together

User avatar
Nevadablue
Demi-Millegniumer
Demi-Millegniumer
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2014 8:33 pm
Location: Nevada
Interests: model trains, model steam
Gn15, G, 1:24ish people and scenery

Postby Nevadablue » Thu Oct 16, 2014 10:57 pm

Nice wagons! I too use the vinegar solution for wood 'preservation' and aging. I also make a mixture of VERY strong Tea in coffee that is a nice inert stain. I make a cup of strong coffee and put 2 or 3 tea bags in it and let it steep. The resulting stain makes a nice dark wood color.

The wood on this tank car is done with the coffee/tea mix.

Image
Ken

User avatar
Simon Andrews
Demi-Millegniumer
Demi-Millegniumer
Posts: 982
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 1:48 pm
Location: Calne, Wiltshire, England.
Interests: narrow gauge modelling, 009, 09.

Postby Simon Andrews » Fri Oct 17, 2014 11:04 am

Steve,
Nice selection of mine tubs. The wooden bodied tubs do make a nice contrast.

Ken,
Interesting idea to use tea and coffee as a stain. How fast / durable is it?

Simon.
Image

User avatar
chris69
Demi-Millegniumer
Demi-Millegniumer
Posts: 561
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2007 7:06 pm
Location: BERLIN Germany
Interests: any thing with narrow gauge and quarries

Postby chris69 » Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:52 pm

Some time ago I made these out of Coffee Stir Sticks.
The weathering was done with a combination of wood aging solution and pastel chalks.
Steve, think yours are absolutely spectacular. Love the wear you built in on the planks as well as the rivets.
Cheers
Chris

Image

Image

Image
Last edited by chris69 on Fri Oct 17, 2014 3:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
It's my RR and it exists,in my mind!!!!!!!!

User avatar
Broadoak
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 335
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 5:42 pm
Location: Northamptonshire
Interests: British Narrow gauge, American shortlines,anything that runs on rails really.

Postby Broadoak » Fri Oct 17, 2014 3:34 pm

Steve,

I like your wooden wagons very much, I think they look very realistic. 8)
Peter M

User avatar
Nevadablue
Demi-Millegniumer
Demi-Millegniumer
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2014 8:33 pm
Location: Nevada
Interests: model trains, model steam
Gn15, G, 1:24ish people and scenery

Postby Nevadablue » Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:29 pm

Simon, I'm not sure how durable the coffee/tea stain is. I did that model maybe 8 months ago (can't remember for sure) and haven't seen any change in it. I intend to finish the thing and seal the wood with something and weather the tank. Nice weather got in the way. :D
Ken

User avatar
Steve Holland
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 149
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2013 8:31 pm
Location: Birmingham, UK
Interests: Narrow gauge railways (WHR and FR in particular), Gn15, 16mm/ft, 7mm/ft, too much going on in life to have a website to look after!

Postby Steve Holland » Sat Nov 01, 2014 9:54 pm

Thanks for the kind comments.
I have been 'confined to barracks' by the doctor, so as an antidote to daytime TV I have built another one of the wooden bodied tubs, and taken some photos to show how they are put together.
The body is made from 5mm x 1.5mm strip wood. The stuff I used was from the local R/C model aircraft shop and it is not basswood. Not being an expert I do not know what sort of wood it is - all I can say for certain is that it is from a tree! I used a toolmakers clamp on my mitre block to ensure all of the pieces are the same length.

Image

For each wagon body you will need 10 pieces at 55mm long for the sides, 10 pieces at 33mm long for the ends and 12 pieces at 36mm long for the floor.

Image

The wood I had was a bit 'splintery' but this was used to advantage and worked in to damage on individual planks. The pieces were distressed a bit with some very coarse abrasive strip from a belt sander before being glued together with the aliphatic resin. My poor long suffering mitre block was flipped upside down and used to ensure that the panels were flat. The ends of the pieces were lined up with the edge of the mitre block to ensure square ends to the panels.

Image

Once all the panels had set one side was centred on the floor and an end added.

Image

This was checked for square and then other side and end were added. The floor was trimmed to length once the glue had set.
All of the ironwork was made from Evergreen styrene strip (Evergreen item numbers in brackets). The corner plates were added first, made from 0.5mm x 4.8mm (128). Once again the mitre block was used to ensure that the edges lined up.

Image

I fixed the styrene to the wooden parts with the Plastic Weld. This was applied to the edges of the styrene parts and gets drawn in by capillary action, fusing the plastic to the wood.
Once the plastic had hardened, the corner was given a slight radius to represent a piece of steel plate that has been folded, and trimmed to match the height of the sides.
The underframe was next, being made from more Evergreen styrene sections.Two pieces of 3.2mm x 6.3mm (189) at 51mm long were needed for the solebars. The headstocks were made from two pieces of 2mm x 6.3mm (169) at 36mm long and another two pieces at 22mm long. The 22mm long pieces are spacers for the solebars and were glued in the centre of the 36mm pieces. Wood grain was added using the coarse abrasive strip.

Image

The notch in the top of the headstock is for the DG couplings that I am using.
In yet another abuse of my tools, one solebar and headstock were assembled on the try square.

Image

You do have to remember to get the notch for the coupling the right way up when assembling the second solebar and headstock! The two part underfames were fixed together on the bottom of the mitre block.

Image

Once this had set it was fixed to the bottom of the wagon body, then the rest of the ironwork was added. The strips in centres of the sides are 0.5mm x 3.2mm (126), with the channels on the end being 0.5mm x 3.2mm (126) for the bottom, and 0.5mm x 2.5mm (125) for the sides of the channel. The channels on the ends are set 5mm from the corner plates. Trim to match the sides once everything has set.

Image

A simple jig made from a bit of styrene strip ensured that all the holes for the bolts lined up - this is aligned with the top of the body sides/ends and a drill used to spot the bolt positions on to the ironwork.

Image

The spotted hole positions were then drilled through and the bolt heads added. The ones I used are O scale 2 1/2 inch nuts on a bolt from EDM Models. Make sure you have plenty of bolt heads to hand as these wagons use loads.

Image

The axle boxes are inspired by the cast ones fitted to the Deptford 18 inch gauge wagons and used more Evergreen styrene. Each one needs a 36mm long piece of 0.5mm x 4.8mm (128) and 0.5mm x 3.2mm (126), a scrap of the 0.5 mm x 3.2mm and four 4.8mm pieces of 2mm x 4.8mm (168).

Image

The wheel base is spotted on to the 0.5mm x 4.8mm strip, 2mm from what will become the top edge. Axle boxes are two of the 2mm thick 4.8mm squares glued together. Assembly was carried out on the trusty mitre block to ensure that the top was square to the side.

Image

The assemblies were then tidied up and the previously spotted holes drilled right through for the wheel bearings. At this stage the wheel bearings are not glued in to place.

Image

Wheels are Hornby R8096, and these were added at the same time as the axle box assemblies were added to the underframe. Check that the axles are parallel with the ends of the wagon.
Once the axle boxes were secure on the underframe a small screwdriver was used through the holes in the axle boxes to adjust the wheel bearings so that the wheel sets are central in the wagon and free running. A small drop of superglue in the axle box holes secured the bearings, then the hole was covered with a square cut from 0.5mm x 3.2mm (126) styrene strip.
The last thing to add was a small piece of Evergreen 1mm diameter rod (211) in a drilled hole to represent an oil filling point.
This is the latest one waiting for a visit to the paint shop.

Image

I decided that the latest wagon has had new top planks fitted and the wagon was put back in to service before they were painted.

Image

All three together.

Image

Couplings and a layer of grot still to add to all three. If you have managed to stay awake to this point, congratulations!! :)
Feel free to try building one or more of these little wagons to the recipe above, I would like to see the results.
Steve Holland



Keep banging the rocks together

User avatar
henrix72se
Seasoned Campaigner
Seasoned Campaigner
Posts: 472
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2003 8:40 pm
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: trains, photography, outdoor life.

Postby henrix72se » Sat Nov 01, 2014 10:32 pm

great show, thanks for showing us!

the result is equally splendid !!

/Henrik
I build Industrial and Military Light Railways in 1/35n18 scale - http://Laurell.Today/

User avatar
Ian-IoM
Seasoned Campaigner
Seasoned Campaigner
Posts: 418
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:05 am
Location: Isle of Man
Interests: Narrow gauge & industrial railways, model making, drinking beer, eating cheese and listening to Pere Ubu.

Postby Ian-IoM » Sun Nov 02, 2014 11:54 am

Gnice tub wagons Steve, something similar would look good for the lower level on my mine layout.

Simon Andrews wrote:Interesting idea to use tea and coffee as a stain. How fast / durable is it?

Many moons ago I used to make balsa & tissue WW1 planes (free flight CO2 power), I used coffee to shrink and stain the tissue. It seemed to last ok, one model flew a bit too well and escaped, it was found a year or so later - a bit sad and soggy but still the same colour.
Ian K
Be seeing you...

User avatar
Thorness
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 227
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:24 pm
Location: Wirral,UK
Interests: Small gauge railways, photography

Postby Thorness » Thu Nov 06, 2014 12:19 pm

Steve thank you for the walk through of your wagon build. I have not built any wagons from scratch as I couldn't think of a way to do the axleboxes - you have solved that for me!

Chris those wagons with the top hinged sides look very interesting, I think that idea may well get copied.

Cheers
Don

Thrubwell Hall
R/C is the way to go.

User avatar
Nevadablue
Demi-Millegniumer
Demi-Millegniumer
Posts: 830
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2014 8:33 pm
Location: Nevada
Interests: model trains, model steam
Gn15, G, 1:24ish people and scenery

Postby Nevadablue » Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:45 pm

Very nice write up Steve, great work! Now I need to look up the parts you used. Those axle boxes for sure. :)
Ken

User avatar
Steve Holland
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 149
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2013 8:31 pm
Location: Birmingham, UK
Interests: Narrow gauge railways (WHR and FR in particular), Gn15, 16mm/ft, 7mm/ft, too much going on in life to have a website to look after!

Postby Steve Holland » Thu Nov 06, 2014 6:07 pm

Reading the build description again, I have realised that I forgot to mention the wheelbase - it is 22mm.
To make sure that both side members of the axle box units have the holes in the right places I drilled one pilot hole in an end of one side member. This was placed on top of the second side member with the ends in line and both pushed against a straight edge to align the top edges, then the hole in the first (uppermost) piece was used to align the drill for to make pilot hole in the one below. The uppermost piece was flipped over and the process repeated to give two holes in the lower piece. Finally both pieces were flipped over, the pilot hole alignment checked (you could put as spare drill through the end where there is a hole in both side members to do this) and the final pilot hole drilled in the first side member.
Much easier to do than describe.
Any make of pin-point wheel bearing will do, the Romford ones I used just happened to be in the 'bits' box.
The main thing with any wagon or carriage is to ensure that the frames are square and flat. Wagons (or locos) running on three wheels out of four are not a good idea as they have an annoying tendency to climb over the outside rail on curves or fall off when passing over points. I used the bottom of the mitre block to assemble the wagon frames as it is flat and the plastic does not stick to it when welded together with solvent.
Steve Holland



Keep banging the rocks together


Return to “Modelling Matters”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests