Stackpole

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

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chris69
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Re: Stackpole

Postby chris69 » Thu Mar 12, 2020 5:17 pm

Hi,
i have been lurking and admiring from afar.....
But your LOCOS are absolutely MAGNIFICENT congrats....love your wagons and the rest etc as well...but they are stunners!
Cheers
Chris
It's my RR and it exists,in my mind!!!!!!!!

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chris stockdale
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Re: Stackpole

Postby chris stockdale » Sat Mar 14, 2020 12:56 pm

Great stuff David. St. Petrox is a delight. We regularly visit Pembrokeshire and have walked around the Stackpole estate several times. Once we were lucky enough to see an otter there.

It seems unimaginable now, but 20 odd years ago I was not that enamoured of Sir Arthurs locomotive designs. It was the shape of the wind sheets, particularly Effie’s, that put me off.

Now, as a major fan, I’m hoping that Si Harris, who trades as Model Earth Design, will bring out a 1/12 scale battery electric Effie. Trouble is, he’s so busy with lots of other stuff. I shall just have to try to be patient.

Sorry to swing off at a bit of a tangent.

Cheers,

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Sun Mar 22, 2020 2:41 pm

Burach*

Started using THE BOOK Vol 1 as a source for modelling information and U was thinking that Mike Decker’s drawings are so good the modeller needs no instructions. But, then I was forgetting modeller’s stupidity, well this modeller’s stupidity at any rate. I was motoring along making the Duffield Bank Parcels Van, cassis done, sides and ends done and sliding doors ready for fitting, put the whole together ... and ... disaster! I had misinterpreted the thickness of the side panelling (by not looking closely enough at Mike’s drawings and, as a result, all the timber framing was far, far too heavy; coming out at 2” rather than the ½” it should have been. Uncorrectable – scrap the whole lot.

But the underfarme was OK. So I put on a planked floor and it has now entered service as a Heywood style bogie flat wagon.

ImageIMG_5722 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Here seen loaded with another novel construction of young Sir John’s his nattily name Port-portmanteau” for use by The Earl and entourage when travelling back-and fore to his Cawdor Estates. The photos were taken as Sir John unveiled the creation to his father. Only time will tell whether The Earl was impressed!

ImageIMG_5713 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5716 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5717 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5720 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Work is well underway on the new Parcels Van – this time in styrene. Thanks for all the likes and comments.

(Burach is a Scottish Gaelic word, which means "a mess, a hash (of something)". The word takes on other meaning such as sating something is a "shambles" or a "mess".)

Cheers

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Mon Mar 30, 2020 2:57 pm

After the burrach -The DBR Parcel Van

ImageIMG_5734 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

So I remade the chassis this time in plasticard, nuts and bolts were courtesy of Shapeways and the floorboards are real timber. The body is mainly Evergreen styrene harf-inch V grove sheet – not cheap but very effective. The panelling is either 3 or 4.5 mm strip of 0.15 thickness (about ½”) this was so over-scale on the Burrach and was the reason I scrapped it.
The roof is individual wood planks covered in card – and these photos show I have forgotten the panelling on the roof. The photos also show a need for a final rub down of the paintwork and a couple more coats.
I also need to prepare the artwork, for the decals – “Third” one end and “Brake” the other, and the metalwork to be sent off to Narrow Planet; this will include door stops that should keep the doors ‘square’.
In the world of Stackpole, young Sir John shows off the new Parcel Van to his father, the Earl, while a member of the railway staff demonstrates that the doors actually open.

ImageIMG_5730 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5731 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
Thanks to Roy and Mike Decker for THE BOOK from which all the information came, and thanks to you for all the likes and comments – and sorry for the awful lighting – must do better next time.
Keep safe

David

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:41 pm

Piano moving

The train ran down to Flimstobe Farm to deliver the upright piano no longer needed in the big house (shame we missed that). Here are the guys having a chat before the return trip.

ImageIMG_5744 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5746 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The keen-eyed will have noticed that the Burrach now has angle iron running down the sides to protect the ends of the timbers, as was Sir Arthur’s practice for the Tops Wagons.

I think this is the first photographs to show the fuel wagon rebuilt from one of the original 4x2 flat wagons.

ImageIMG_5743 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Stay safe

David

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Fri Apr 10, 2020 12:19 pm

DBR 8 seat bogie carriage

Again from THE BOOK Vol1, a model of Sir Arthur’s first bogie carriage. As with the Parcel Van the body is built from plasticard on Smallbook bogies. In the real world it was thought that this vehicle was scrapped around 1895 but, in the Stackpole version, all that was wrong was that Sir Arthur’s non-standard timber frame bogies had rotted. He gave the coah to young Sir John for use in the building of the Stackpole Railway – all Sir John had to do was replace the bogies with a pair to Sir Arthur’s later design. It is interesting that both Sir John and I had to do minor alterations to the chassis to get the new, slightly larger, bogies to fit.

Here is the official photograph, wait for it, wait for it ...

ImageIMG_5751 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... OK, you can get on now.

ImageIMG_5754 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

One of the major operation differences between miniature and full-size railways is the role of hand-shunting. Here ST PETROX heads into Flimstone Farm ...

ImageIMG_5756 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... with a short train, including the new bogie carriage ...

ImageIMG_5759 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr


... and the Parcel Van ...

ImageIMG_5761 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... the train stops, and the Parcel Van is uncoupled, the train then draws forward for the passengers to alight.

ImageIMG_5762 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The points are changes and the Van is manhandled into the siding...

ImageIMG_5765 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... the coach is then uncoupled from the loco, pushed back, points changed, and recoupled to the Van.

ImageIMG_5767 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The loco then couples up to the train, having effectively “run round”. With the passengers off for a picnic at Freshwater West the empty train returns to Stackpole.

ImageIMG_5768 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

All in a day’s work.

ImageIMG_5772 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Stay safe

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chris stockdale
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Re: Stackpole

Postby chris stockdale » Fri Apr 10, 2020 3:35 pm

Delightful.

Cheers,

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Wed Apr 22, 2020 10:44 am

The DBR Low Side Bogie Wagon

Another one from THE BOOK VOL 1! Now, having built four under-frames for Heywood bogie stock (including the Burrach) in 1/24th scale, I feel confident enough to share my construction techniques. This last one had the under-frame cut from 2mm styrene (this is a tad under-scale at almost 2” – 3mm (3”) would have been better but the thinner material allows for more swing for the bogies and is a sight easier to cut!). The Burrach had 1/8th Lime strip which worked just as well but without the smoothness of finish seen in the photographs. In all cases I used the Smallbrook Studios Heywood bogies.

I long grew out of any desire to spend time marking out: nowadays I photocopy the drawing to the correct size, cut out the bits I need and stick them to the material – here I used Pritt removable tape (rather like the gum on Post It Notes), but ordinary kids Pritt Stick works just as well – simply soak to remove once done.

ImageIMG_5778 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

All bolt and rivet holes are ‘popped’ from the drawing – I use my rivet press to get the alignment as good as I can. These are then drilled 1mm before attacking the styrene. The cut-aways at the under-frame ends are first drilled, then cut away before filing to the correct shape with some ancient bastard files (language Timothy!).

ImageIMG_5779 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Once all the parts were cut out they were cleaned up, paper removed and any burrs lightly sanded away. For this model I had decided to fit a false floor.

ImageIMG_5797 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The various bits were then glued together. Of more interest is the ‘universal jig’; a sheet of steel plate (this one came from an old filing cabinet) and various magnets. This holds pieces firmly in place until the join has set. As you see here it can also be used with the new ‘snap lock’ corner magnets for 3 dimensional alignment. I cannot remember who introduced me to this idea – it is very, very, old, but I haven’t seen it described recently.

ImageIMG_5802 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The cross members are then fixed and the end-beams cut and filed to shape to clear the couplings.

ImageIMG_5649 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

To finish this post here is the timber frame of the Burrach at the same stage.

To be continued (I have a lawn that needs cutting).

Stay safe

David

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Sun Apr 26, 2020 1:22 pm

The DBR Low Side Bogie Wagon - II

I dislike fixing bogie pivots into a plasticard floor. One alternative is to drill and tap 8BA a couple of thickish pieces of brass strip and solder in a brass bolts, cutting off the heads and filing all flat.

ImageIMG_5809 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

These can then be Araldited (other glues are available!) in place, epoxy gives time to make sure the positioning is spot-on. The bogie clearance under Heywood bogie stock is not great and a little more swing can be gained by filing down the corners of the bogies – or cutting, but do be careful not to take too much off. (Guess how I know!)

ImageIMG_5812 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5815 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

In the normal course or events I would fix the bogie pins and then spray the underside (with a little bit of tube or tape on the bolt threads), but on this occasion my modelling was running ahead of the Post Office and I did not want to fix the pivots until the bogies themselves had been delivered!

And that’s it for my current method of building chassis for Heywood bogie stock. The Smallbrook mouldings are cleaned up and drill 3mm clearance hole, scrubbed with Cif and warm water , spray painted and then wheels and couplings fitted.
On this one I went on to try something different (for me, at least). This is a low-sided wagon. Mike Decker’s drawing shows this as just one plank about 10” wide. I cut this from 1mm styrene and glued it in place, supported by Evergreen angle corners and three straps each side, with rivet detail.

ImageIMG_5803 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Once all was dry I sprayed the wagon, black on the underside and then red oxide primer followed by two coats of Tamiya Red Brown – the Stackpole standard colour – all from rattle cans.
I have never had a huge success painting plastic to look like weathered wood, so on this wagon I made the sides deliberately too thin, Pre-stained wood planks were laid on the floor ...

ImageIMG_5806 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

.. and pieces of 1/32nd Obechi cut, stained and glued inside the sides and ends.

ImageIMG_5807 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

I then glued pre-blackened bolt detail to the sides and the wagon was ready to enter service.

ImageIMG_5817 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Here it is, being shunred at Flimstone Farm ...

ImageIMG_5819 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5826 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
... and out at Linney Head.

ImageIMG_0515 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_0519 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

And sheep? A real menace on a 15” gauge railway!

ImageIMG_5830 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Stay safe

David

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Re: Stackpole

Postby DCRFAN 3 » Mon Apr 27, 2020 2:55 am

Please stop tempting me or will have to stop watching this thread as I don't need another project. :D

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Thu Apr 30, 2020 12:38 pm

Heywood Bolster Wagons

ImageIMG_5848 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

I have just finished two Heywood bolster wagons. Sir Arthur designed cast iron bolsters to fit his standard “Top” wagons. Mike Decker has produced excellent drawings in THE BOOK VOL1 and I built mine out of various styrene sections. On Sir Arthur’s railways 2” steel posts were inserted in to the sockets, to suit whatever load was being carried, but mine are more firmly fixed with superglue. The bolster is drilled and tapped 10BA and is pivoted on a bolt through the wagon chassis.

ImageIMG_6348 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Here we see two of the bolster wagons being picked up by the morning staff train from Flimston Yard (the nearest the railway gets to the village of Castle Martin).

ImageIMG_6347 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

ST PETROX uncouples from the train and draws forward to collect the bolsters,

ImageIMG_5850 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Before adding them to the train, and then setting off for the big house.

ImageIMG_5851 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Hours of fon

Stay safe

David

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Fri May 01, 2020 5:27 pm

Skip!

Yesterday I received one of TeeBee’s Gn15 skips from Shapeways. After an overnight bath in white spirit, some smoothing and a real fiddle trying to get the coupler height to match the rest of my stok - here it is!

ImageIMG_5861 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5858 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Stay safe

David

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Sun May 03, 2020 9:26 am

The Earl and family decamp to their Scottish estate for the season ...

ImageIMG_5890 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Stay safe

David

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Sun May 24, 2020 3:54 pm

Greenbridge Lodge

On the Angle peninsula, to the west of Bosherston, the Pembrokeshire coastline has some spectacular cliffs. Before the Second World War this was private land, owned by the Stackpole Estate; the area was rented by tenant farmers but there was a coastal strip that was not used as grazing land. It is along this piece of land, between fields and cliff-edge, that my Stackpole Railway runs; with a branch inland serving Flimstone Farm (and a short walk away Castle Martin) while the main line (sic) continues on towards Linney Head. Just before the junction for Flimstone there is a picturesque cliff formation, now known as the “Green Bridge of Wales” but during the period modelled this was all private estate land: it would have only been known to a select few so, perhaps, had the more mundane name of “Green Bridge”?

ImageIMG_4774 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

So, it was here, that young Sir John built “Greenbridge Lodge”: not a station in the normal sense but a pavilion to provide shelter and succour for numerous occasions: shooting parties, family picnics, a place to luncheon visitors to the Greenbride, somewhere to send the children (or to go to get away from them) and even staff outings. The accommodation of the Lodge could be supplemented by the Dining and Sleeping Cars Sir John had purchased from Sir Arthur Heywood and a large storage area was available in the roof space to allow the furniture to be changed to match the occasion. For those who know the area Greenbrifge Lodge was very nearly on the site of the current visitor car-park.

The building is based on “The Play House” on the Glan Usk Estate,just down the road from me here in Monmouthshire

ImageIMG_0312 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Buildings in 1/24th scale are big, so the prototype has been selectively compressed – probably to the extent that the interior does not make sense. It has been known to rain in this part of Wales, so the main accommodation is under the generous roof, rather than indoors. A destination like this would have been a fair weather only visit.

The model is essentially built from Pallite and blue foam...

ImageIMG_4815 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

covered in a delightfull embossed brick card that had the lower courses darkend with a gelt tip pen to match prototype.

ImageIMG_4868 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

I found some nice (almost working) sash windows from Jennifer’s of Walsall, some have been fitted in an ‘open’ position.

An “under-roof’ was cut from 2mm m.d.f., covered with coffee stirrers ...

ImageIMG_4871 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... and fitted with blocks to bear on the supporting uptights.

ImageIMG_4872 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The interior is lined with 2mm blue foam with dolls-house paper applied. The font door is from Petite Properties and is hinged and “latched” with a magnet to hold it closed when required. Working oil lamps and some furniture has also been installed.

ImageIMG_5928 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5930 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
All pretty conventional apart from that damned roof: with both rectangular and scallop tiles there was no alternative but to hand-lay the lot – and an uncorrectable cock-up meant I had to do it twice! The perfect “lock-down project” – I just couldn’t get away from it!

ImageIMG_5905 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5936 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

A base of 2mm m.d.f. and 5mm blue foam was laid round the building and covered in 1/12th scale “real slates” with the supporting ‘tree trunks’ 10mm diam. Balsa, hacked about a bit and covered in Greenscene Bark Texture, then given a wash of diluted matt black acrylic.

ImageIMG_5895 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Finally the front gable (Evergreen V Grove sheet) was fitted with Slaters 6mm lettering to give the building its name.

ImageIMG_5939 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Here it is posed for photographs. As Rhyd migrates westwards a start will be made on the Gn15 layout imminently (while I should be packing the 014 layout?)

ImageIMG_5902 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_5907 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_0001 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_0006 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
Thanks for all the likes and comments, and to Graham Warrick and Jennifer’s of Walsall.
Stay safe

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Re: Stackpole

Postby Remote1 » Sun May 24, 2020 5:02 pm

Absolutely breathtaking!!!

Steve
Steve

Modelling skills on order..........

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Re: Stackpole

Postby Thorness » Tue May 26, 2020 10:21 pm

Stunning!
Don

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R/C is the way to go.

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Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Sun Jun 21, 2020 6:05 pm

Lockdown Improvised “Shooting Brake”

To make life harder during Lockdown we have been packing stuff away for the next (and final) house move. Although I tried to plan, most of the stuff I seemed to need for this model were packed away before I needed them! Hey-ho!
First, the fiction: As well as being a popular leisure activity the Stackpole Estate relied heavily on the gun to put meat on the table, as this extract from the Estate “Game Book” illustrates.

ImageIMG_4119 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

During his “apprenticeship” with Sir Arthur Heywood, young Sir John designed and built a “shooring brake” – in which he could ride out to the cliffs of an evening, sit comfortably and shoot the passing wildlife and have a vehicle to carry the ‘kill’ back to the house. It was only after the Shooting Brake was superseded by grander conveyances that the Estate sold it to the Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway.

ImageIMG_0032 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Again it was back to The Book Vol1 and Mike Decker’s excellent drawings, for this model. I could not source the correct chassis from either Smallbrook nor Shapeways and my usual alternative plastic section was packed away and unfindable; so one was cobbled together from bits of waste timber, and fitted with Keen Eye Models Heywood axleboxes.

ImageIMG_0027 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

I had had the sense not to pack my Evergreen ‘V’ Siding, so the body was straight forward. I couldn’r find my miniature piano hinge stash so I bodged something together using brass shim, a slight problem is that the “lid” opens by around 120° and my method leaves an ugly gap; the alternative is a loose lid that can be either open or closed but not hinged.


ImageIMG_0034 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Again I fudged an approximation of the brake-gear and foot pedal. Everything was sprayed with red oxide primer and then after a light rub down, with Tamiya Red Brown. I fitted Kadee cpuplings but the buffer beans looked a little bare so I improvised something out of 5mm Pallite sheet that will be replaced by something a little more realistic after my next order from Eileen’s Emporium.

ImageIMG_0043 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

And that was it finished apart from the n/b/w castings on the sideframes – I know they are here somewhere.
Out of the blue I received a nice surprise from Germany, a Gn15 bogie wagon; Hudson had something very similar that they labelled “for light loads, such as hay or straw”, so this will go into service collecting straw from the Estate farms for the stables back at Stackpole House.

ImageIMG_0048 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Thank you Ronald (you know who you are) and to Roy and Mike – when’s Vol2 coming out? Next is the 1905 DBR Coach – if I can find all the bits.
To complete this model perhaps I need to ask Modelu to produce a figure holding a broken shotgun? Can’t be me though – I could never qualify as “Young Sir John”!

Stay safe

ImageIMG_0050 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

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Re: Stackpole

Postby Remote1 » Mon Jun 22, 2020 5:29 pm

This just keeps getting better and better! Superb modelling - where's the "like" button?

Steve
Steve



Modelling skills on order..........


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