Gnutley Grange, another pizza saga and the techniques used.

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Postby michael » Thu Sep 06, 2007 6:47 am

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Sep 06, 2007 6:47 am

Gerry Bullock wrote:or, maybe more appropriate:
http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/dcr0106l.jpg
:wink:


:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby DCRfan » Thu Sep 06, 2007 6:49 am

Not true It related to the "Dean of Narrow Gauge Information


Perhaps this reply be on Casemate Thread? I think Dean it too low. we need to determine the process for GnBeatification then but GnCanonization :wink: 'arise saint Steve :P
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Postby Gerry Bullock » Thu Sep 06, 2007 6:56 am

DCRfan wrote:
Not true It related to the "Dean of Narrow Gauge Information


Perhaps this reply be on Casemate Thread? I think Dean it too low. we need to determine the process for GnBeatification then but GnCanonization :wink: 'arise saint Steve :P


Unfortunately there's this little matter to deal with first:
http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoon ... vn101l.jpg
Actually I used it to build a Gn15 Diorama :wink:
Sorry Steve, the hair's all wrong :twisted:
So little time, so many ideas!!!!! GerryB.
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Postby DCRfan » Thu Sep 06, 2007 7:14 am

I'm sure the only skeletons in his kennel are resin ones (or he has a picture filed away to prove it was someone else) :lol: :lol:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Sep 06, 2007 11:14 am

:lol: Stop it, all this laughter is making my stomach hurt :lol:
It's not me that has a picture for every occassion, that would be Juergen, complete with skeletons :lol:
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Postby andrew milner » Thu Sep 06, 2007 3:35 pm

Steve Bennett wrote::lol: Stop it, all this laughter is making my stomach hurt :lol:
It's not me that has a picture for every occassion, that would be Juergen, complete with skeletons :lol:



Wait for it....... :D
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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Jun 30, 2008 1:30 pm

Time to add a bit more here. Some may remember that last year I collected a load of grass seeds ro use as plants (seen here : http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?p=32110#32110 ). 12 months on and I have started to collect them again, but still not really made use of last years crop, so a bit of a play. I thought I would use some to represent a reed bed at the side of some water, here is the results of the first experiments.

Image

Both lots here were harvested at the same time. The ones planted in the reed bed were just kept in an open tray and those in the pot have been exposed to direct sunlight, quite surprising the difference in colour. The main reason for this play though was to try to work out how best to plant the edges of the water. I hit on the idea of using Tea to represent the dead plant material that collects in reed beds and use this to plant the seeds into. I think the results show some promise and it was very easy to do. hopefully this will help to illustrate.

Image

The tea was mixed with a little PVA glue and dark brown acrylic paint into a thick paste, then a little water added to thin it down a bit. This was then put onto a piece of clear acrylic sheet (or laminted paper, front left) and prodded into shape. I tried both leaving it to dry fully and to partially set, to see what worked best and found inserting the reeds/seeds was easiest before it had fully dried out and hardened. the seeds were set in place after dipping the ends into superglue and this gives a very solid join.

I had hoped to make these clumps as moveable item that could be positioned temporarily before fixing in place, but that was only partially successful. They will peel away from the acrylic sheet fairly easily, but once done, the bases tend to curl, which would make it difficult to stick down again. So the next experiment will be a complete pond on a larger piece of clear acrylic, once I find a suitable piece :roll: . One final pic for now, of the clump placed on an empty CD case, it does kinda work to depict water for the photo.

Image

More to come when i find the time for a further play :wink: .
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Postby Jon Randall » Mon Jun 30, 2008 5:51 pm

Great timing, thanks Steve :D
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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Jun 30, 2008 10:16 pm

Jon Randall wrote:Great timing, thanks Steve :D


Well I wasnt really ready to go with this yet, but thought it might be a help to you Jon. In fact it was your layout that set the thought processes going in this direction :wink:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Jul 10, 2008 1:15 pm

A little more experimenting and a nice way to relax at the end of the day. I was going to make a larger pond, but thought I would start small to try out a few ideas first, plus it might just appear as a small fishpond on a pizza layout :wink: . The base was a scrap of clear acrylic sheet that was lying around, roughly 70mm by 55mm. The banks were made up as desribed above, using old Tea, PVA glue and brown acrylic paint, mixed into a paste and then prodded into shape using the plastic handle of an old cheap paintbrush. Plastic tools do work better for this kind of thing as the paste doesnt stick to it and if it starts to as it dries, simply wetting it will stop it from sticking. Once in place, a slight variation to my previous experiments. I wanted a slightly looser texture than before, so soaked the paste making up the banks of the pond, with dilute PVA, then sprinkled on dried Tea and left it to dry overnight. Next morning the excess was brushed off and here is the basic shape of the pond.

Image

I think this extra step, gives a bit better representation of all the dead plant material that collects along the waters edge. I'm hoping it will keep this texture as further work is added to it. You may also note the slightly opaque look of the water, this is just a bit of protective film on the underside, which will be removed later.

Now comes the fun part of adding some plant life :) if the truth be told, the reason I wanted to try this. Still early days yet and not much fixed in place yet, but here are the first steps. Oh I might add that so far, the total cost, is ZERO, but I do have a good selection of bits cluttering up the house :D

Image

Most will now recognise the grass seeds used for the tall reeds, still a lot more of these to add.
The water lily's have the leaves made simply from green paper, punched with a simple hole punch. I may darken these yet with a dark green acrylic ink, they are a little bit light at the moment.
The flowers are again punched, this time from yellow photocopier paper, using a punch intended for decorating greeting cards.
The broadleaved plants along the banks, are made with the same punch as the lily flowers, this time with a cheap printer paper which has been stained green with an acrylic ink.

Still a long way to go yet, but there might be a few ideas that will be useful to someone. I will leave you for now with a closer look.

Image
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Postby gfadvance » Thu Jul 10, 2008 3:08 pm

Thanks Steve, a reminder to us all that simple bits and pieces can produce top calss results - when they are used with a bit of imagination, and the odd dash of skill :)
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Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Jul 10, 2008 5:55 pm

gfadvance wrote:Thanks Steve, a reminder to us all that simple bits and pieces can produce top calss results - when they are used with a bit of imagination, and the odd dash of skill :)


Yes, it is surprising what you can do with a few bits of paper, a very versatile material.
One thing to be careful of when using old used Tea as a scenic material, is that, if used with dilute PVA/white glue and soaked, like you would ballast, it can go very dark, almost black. Have a play first before trying it on a layout, to get a feel for how it will come out. Makes a good representation of Peat aswell :wink:
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Postby Rockley Bottom » Thu Jul 10, 2008 7:30 pm

Steve,

I can see a small stream with rushes becoming a must as part of the layout
[CHANGE OF PLAN :!: CHANGE OF PLAN :!:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Jul 10, 2008 11:21 pm

Rockley Bottom wrote:I can see a small stream with rushes becoming a must as part of the layout
[CHANGE OF PLAN :!: CHANGE OF PLAN :!:


Or a drainage culvert under the track :?: As if you didnt have enough water already with your canal :lol:
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Postby Rockley Bottom » Fri Jul 11, 2008 8:20 am

Steve
I like the culvert idea :!:
I remember local culverts drained from the pit yard or the slag heaps. the water was usually a bright red with iron oxide and other minerals
I will probably go for a pastoral scene
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Teasel or is it a Triffid

Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Aug 14, 2008 2:40 pm

As these are around at the moment, thought it might be a good time to add another piece of natural material that can prove useful. Not sure how many will recognise this, the flower head of the plant known in these parts as the Teasel. It was widely cultivated in days gone by for the wool trade and I guess thats where it got its common name from, as it was used to tease out wool. As I have an ancient pack horse track about 50 feet away from the house, which was used to transport wool, these are very common around here, they even seed into the garden, I have one plant at the moment which is about 8' high.

Image

The one on the left is as it came from the plant, the centre one has had the base removed, which is easiy done with a sharp knife. These were cut before reaching full size, to use as pot plants. Will be interesting to see how long the colour lasts, when they fade and probably turn brown, they will get a spray of green paint.
Finally the somewhat larger one on the right. Took me a while to find this, it was about 18 years ago that I collected this one. If I remember rightly, it was harvested in late autumn after drying out on the plant. It was given a spray of photomount spray and spinkled with Woodland Scenics fine turf and has been gathering dust ever since, it never got used on a layout, though several others did. So you can see, they do last pretty well.

A word of caution, these things have nasty spikes on the stems. To remove the base, I push a toothpick/cocktail stick into the hollow stem and then use this to hold them, it's a lot better on the fingers :) . These are probably of more use when modelling a cultivated setting like a garden, but could also serve as young Pine trees on a mountain layout. Anybody want to model a christmas tree farm with a railway :wink:
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Postby Jon Randall » Thu Aug 14, 2008 7:18 pm

Looks good Steve.
If you have any spare how about trimming the hairy ends off before flocking :?:
Another thought :arrow: I wonder what pine cones would look like with the same treatment :?:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Fri Aug 15, 2008 3:56 am

Jon Randall wrote:If you have any spare how about trimming the hairy ends off before flocking :?:
Another thought :arrow: I wonder what pine cones would look like with the same treatment :?:


It probably looks that way on the flocked one, but the whole thing is made up of very fine leaflets/bracts as I hope the closer view shows. This also shows well the vicious spikes, gloves are a good idea for collecting them :) . The usable part is very soft to the touch, almost feels a bit like hair in fact, even though it looks like it should be hard to the touch. After drying on the plant they do go hard and stiff, be interesting to see how the imature ones go with time.

Image

Pine cones could be an idea worth trying, they certainly have a good shape and once coated in flock, should look pretty good as small conifers. Will have to give it a try sometime. Nice idea.
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Postby More_Cats_Than_Sense » Fri Aug 15, 2008 12:08 pm

Steve Bennett wrote:
Image



Is it only me? I see that as a Triffid Hybrid :shock:

At least if you have one on a layout, you can put up "Heavy Plant Crossing" signs :twisted: :twisted:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Fri Aug 15, 2008 12:54 pm

More_Cats_Than_Sense wrote:At least if you have one on a layout, you can put up "Heavy Plant Crossing" signs :twisted: :twisted:


:lol: :lol: :lol:
Yes, they definately have a Triffid like appearance.
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Postby Steve Bennett » Wed Aug 20, 2008 9:47 pm

Just a short piece on grass seeds. I was going to do a bit more than this, but another project is getting in the way :) . While there is still time this year to collect them, I thought it might be worth showing the 2 different types that I find useful. They will have names I'm sure, but I have no idea what they are, so a photo to show them instead.

Image

The type on the left, is the one that I used to represent reeds around the little pond shown earlier. Although, they can be used as they are to create clumps, without glue they will fall apart into individual seeds with a long tail on, so are best planted as individual stems, which is how I used them. They scale to approx 4' high

The type on the right, is better for small clumps of tall grass. Each seed has 5 stems or leaflets ? attached to them and stay together well. the two individual seeds shown at the bottom right are over a year old and show no signs of coming apart any further. Not as tall as the type on the left, but several grouped together work very well as a small clump of tall grass and would scale to about 3' high for the longest stems.

Both types fade from green to a straw colour over time, but they take staining well. I use a diluted green acrylic ink which gives them a lasting colour, with the added bonus that it strengthens them and makes them less brittle once dried out.

I wouldnt recommend them at the front of a layout where they could get damaged, but against a wall or similar where they wont get accidentally knocked, they should last for years.
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Postby Korschtal » Thu Aug 21, 2008 6:35 am

More_Cats_Than_Sense wrote:
Is it only me? I see that as a Triffid Hybrid :shock:


No it's not just you. That's the first thing I thought of when I saw the picture
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Postby Steve Bennett » Fri May 15, 2009 12:58 pm

Time to bring this thread back from the depths of the forum with a new tip :lol: OK poor excuse :roll:
I wish I had thought of this while doing the detailing on Simplicity Sidings, it would have fitted in well, but never mind, it will fit with my other ramblings in this thread.

I'm sure that others must have done this as well, but no harm in pointing it out for those who might not have seen it. The subject is a very simple Crow Bar (Pry Bar I think in the US :?: ) and is made from something that we probably all have lying about the place. I will let the picture do the talking, words are not really needed.

Image

Yes, the humble paper clip :) . I used two different sizes here, the one on the far left is a large size one, while the green one is a plastic coated version of the more normal size, guess who couldnt find another plain one after cutting up the one I used :roll:
These take minutes to make with minimal tools. A pair of cutters to cut to length, a bit of bending with pliers or a vice, followed by filing the ends to a flat point and thats about it. I guess it takes longer to paint them if you feel you want to. With these I used a black marker pen on some, then dumped them in the rusting agent from a rust paint kit. I would have tried vinegar, but I have run out, but it may well work to start the rust process, I'm not sure as I wasn't able to try it.

My reason for making them, was to hang on the back of a loco cab, which was a bit plain,

Image

But of course, I couldn't make just one and there are many places that they could be used on a layout, hanging on a wall or just lying about.

Image

Well, thats about it, maybe if you find yourself with a few minutes to spare over the weekend, you might want to have a play :wink:
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Postby Jon Randall » Fri May 15, 2009 4:09 pm

So simple its brilliant 8)

If I run out of vinegar, I just eat another pickled egg and there's another inch :D
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