Gnutley Grange, another pizza saga and the techniques used.

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

Moderator: GnATTERbox Moderators

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Fri May 15, 2009 4:38 pm

Jon Randall wrote:If I run out of vinegar, I just eat another pickled egg and there's another inch :D


:lol: I think the only pickles I have at the moment is beetroot, didnt really want them pink :wink:
Steve Bennett
Sidelines
http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Wed Apr 25, 2012 11:45 am

Time to bring this old thread back from the depths yet again :lol:
Recently I seem to have been working on lots of small projects, with no layout in mind, so this seemed the ideal place to dump them.

The first subject of the return of this thread, is actually a kit, which is a bit of a departure from what has gone on before :)
This is an excellent little kit for a greenhouse from Petite Properties who produce kits in the smaller dollshouse scales. The name may be familiar, as Gerry has written about their furniture in his Gnine thread.
The kit is made from laser cut mountboard, with an MDF base and clear acetate for the glazing. It is very easy to make up straight from the pack and would probably take only a few hours, but being me, I had to play around and add extra bits too, so has taken me a lot longer :lol:

Anyway, here it is nearing completion, thought I have still got to finish off the roof.

Image

and here we are without the roof on, it gives quite good access to add details inside.

Image

Now we come to where I have strayed from the instructions and made life more difficult for myself :roll:
In order to be able to get full access inside for detailing, I built the shell of the greenhouse seperate from the base, which it is supposed to be attached to. A little tricky to get square like this, but not too bad, as it is very accuratly cut.

Here it is the base with the building shell removed:

Image

The base is MDF and the low retaining wall also, with the brick pattern lasered into it. The kit comes with a sheet of bubbly wallpaper to represent a stone and dirt floor, but having tried standing things on it, I decided this was not flat enough for my use, so I went for a tile effect.
This is a sheet of mount board, with the grout lines cut with a double bladed craft knife, then painted and grouted with a thinned plaster.
My photography let me down here, the tiles have a nice mottled effect, which was applied with a sponge and the grouting is far from white, as it appears here.
The other modification, is the raised bed on the left. It comes with a piece of 3mm MDF to raise it above floor level, but as I used a thicker floor, felt it needed raising up a bit more. Really simple to do, a piece of 5mm thick foamcore cut to size, then dried out tea from a teabag glued on top to represent the soil. The foamcore will also be an ideal base to plant into as most of my plants have a wire stem.
A second piece will be made to represent a gravel bed to stand potted plants on, so they can be interchanged.

Next we have a few temporary details being added.

Image

As mentioned above, the soil topped raised bed, will have stuff planted into it, when I get around to making them :) For now though a few exotic plants in pots, which will be used with the gravel bed version.
Not sure about the potting bench at the end yet, I kinda like the idea of having a cupboard or multiple shelves underneath to store junk, so the bench (borrowed from my exhibition display) might yet get replaced.
On the right, or side nearest the camera, will be a shelf, just below window level going the full length of the greenhouse. I did make one from coffee stirrers, but the damned thing kept warping, so I will have to dig out the balsa to make a replacement. The shelf will have even more potted plants, yes I have loads of them. It will also provide a nice space underneath to hoard even more junk. As you might guess, there is still a lot more detailing to do here.

Talking of detail, I will finish up today, with a closer view of the potting bench.

Image

Still lots to do with this if I decide to use one of these kits, it looks far too clean and tidy at the moment, but I hope it gives an idea of what is to come.

Anyway, hope you found something interesting in this visit to my miniature greenhouse and maybe found something useful or entertaining.
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
rjt
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:40 pm
Location: Isle of Wight, UK
Interests: 16mm -NG & garden railwayscales

help gneeded please

Postby rjt » Wed Apr 25, 2012 6:08 pm

Where can I get a rail bender from, I'm new to this site and thought I'd have a go at a 9mm Pizza using Peco flexitrack , and what is the tightest bend possible. I'm assuming the rail needs to be removed from the sleepers before being bent but is it possible to bend the track without. Is there an 'idiots guide' somewhere that I should read?

Rob (it's a long time since I did any railway modelling ) :?
Rob (but Gnever 'Bob')

User avatar
jacko
True GnATTERbox
True GnATTERbox
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 9:30 pm
Location: ipswich suffolk
Interests: model railways ng

Postby jacko » Wed Apr 25, 2012 6:22 pm

Hi its going to depend on what you going to run ie 0-4-0 0-6-0
jacko

User avatar
Boghopper
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 6:52 pm
Location: East Sussex
Interests: Narrow gauge railway modelling

Postby Boghopper » Wed Apr 25, 2012 7:15 pm

I love your plants Steve. Here I some I made earlier(!) when I was making giftware. The trugs are a couple of inches long and the topiary about four inches high. They were cast in plaster from silicon moulds and hand-painted with Humbrols.

The figures were my take on the village show.

Image
Round and Round the Garden CARD 1 by shingelsea, on Flickr
Image
Round and Round the Garden CARD 2 by shingelsea, on Flickr

Image
the village show, Chris O'Donoghue by shingelsea, on Flickr
Capability Chris

Creating beautiful gardens across the southeast
http://chrisodonoghue.co.uk
http://gdngrs.com Greenwich and District Narrow Gauge Railway Society
- visit http://expong.org Expo Narrow Gauge

Cross Kitter
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 212
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 12:23 pm
Location: The Duchy of Cornwall, Just to the west of England
Interests: G Scale

Postby Cross Kitter » Wed Apr 25, 2012 9:18 pm

Hi Steve,

Excellent potting bench and lovely detail.

My Great Aunt Doris, dear of her, used a table to do her potting on. When she died my parents got someone round to value the estate for probate. It reduced a hard bitten antiques dealer to tears when he saw the potting table. It was a Chippendale Table which, had it not been drenched in water and had peat and earth ground into it, would have been worth over £20,000 :shock: .

I think the dealer went away jibbering and sobbing into his cravat :lol:

Simon
Simon the "not at all cross"-kitter.
I'm looking for that decrepit look. What, I just need to look in the mirror?

User avatar
Adrian
Demi-Millegniumer
Demi-Millegniumer
Posts: 718
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2009 8:18 am
Location: Melbourne Australia
Interests: model railways including Gn15

Postby Adrian » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:54 am

G'day Rob

Where can I get a rail bender from, I'm new to this site and thought I'd have a go at a 9mm Pizza using Peco flexitrack , and what is the tightest bend possible. I'm assuming the rail needs to be removed from the sleepers before being bent but is it possible to bend the track without. Is there an 'idiots guide' somewhere that I should read?

Unless you are planning to do a lot of pizzas a rail-bender is probably an over-kill.

I have, in the past, used the edge of the workbench to curve any track that I wanted bent.
Just hold the track at both ends and run it back and forward over the bench edge.
The ends will probably not bend properly so be prepared to sacrifice them.
Do not use the kitchen or living room table because this technique can leave grooves in the edge of the work top.

I have managed to produce a circle of 9 mm track about 4" (100mm) diameter with this method.
Image

I have never managed to bend a length of assembled flex-track to any small radius at any time.
If you do decide to have a go might I suggest that you remove a number of the 'webs' between the sleepers to allow the base to bend more readily.

If you do want to go 'hi-tech' Fast-Track do a railbender which is suitable for the smaller codes of rail.
http://www.handlaidtrack.com/Fast-Track ... l-0004.htm
( Only you can decide if it worth the cost to you ).

One problem with tight radius curves is that sometimes the gauge needs to be eased slightly to allow for good running of some stock.
However if the original flex sleeper base is used the gauge can, sometimes, shrink slightly.
This is not what you want.
Soldering the track to PCB sleepers can solve this problem, but then you really need a track gauge.
Both the sleepers and the track gauge can be purchased from SMP. http://www.smpscaleway.com/

As far as I know there is no 'idiots guide' for track laying and if there was it probably wouldn't describe the sort of track that is common to the majority of the members of the forum.

Because the amount of track that you will be using is so small, unless it is an enormous pizza there is not much lost if you have a go and mess it up :oops:
Don't bother to ask me how I know this :oops: :oops:

I have found that track-laying is more of an art than a science so be prepared for a few setbacks.
I know that I have had more than my fair share over the years.

Cheers
Adrian Hoad
I might be daft but not stupid.

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Re: help gneeded please

Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Apr 26, 2012 6:35 am

rjt wrote:Where can I get a rail bender from, I'm new to this site and thought I'd have a go at a 9mm Pizza using Peco flexitrack , and what is the tightest bend possible. I'm assuming the rail needs to be removed from the sleepers before being bent but is it possible to bend the track without. Is there an 'idiots guide' somewhere that I should read?


It is easy to make a railbender, have a look here :
http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=347
Peco flex track is fine and yes you would need to remove the sleeper base in order to bend it to a tight radius, then seperate the sleepers and thread them back onto the bent rails one at a time. tedious but worth it.
As for how tight, that depends what you want to run around it, but I would recommend 6inches as a minimum radius, most couplings will cope with that.
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Apr 26, 2012 6:43 am

Boghopper wrote:I love your plants Steve. Here I some I made earlier(!) when I was making giftware. The trugs are a couple of inches long and the topiary about four inches high. They were cast in plaster from silicon moulds and hand-painted with Humbrols.


Thanks Chris, the plants have become a bit of a hobby on their own :)
A few bits of wire and paper can keep me amused for hours at a time.
Here is a picture box I made as a christmas present, hate to think how many plants there are in there and the hours that went into it :roll:

Image

I like the plaster castings and the people have great characters, can just imagine them at a flower show :)
Trying to get a handle on scale, your dimensions sound like they could be around 1/6th ish, though I appreciate they are not intended to be exact scale models.
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Apr 26, 2012 6:46 am

Cross Kitter wrote:Hi Steve,
Excellent potting bench and lovely detail.


Thanks Simon, I can assure you that bench is not Chippendale under the grime, probably came out of a Sidelines mould if the truth be told :lol:
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
Boghopper
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 6:52 pm
Location: East Sussex
Interests: Narrow gauge railway modelling

Postby Boghopper » Thu Apr 26, 2012 8:58 am

What a wonderful picture box Steve. Amazing what you can do with paper. I do hope the recipient realised how much work you'd put into it!

I think the garden things I made were more like 1/12, so nearer to dolls house scale. The figures were likewise that sort of scale. If I'd had enough forethought I could have made them exact and found a wider market. Hindsight's a great thing eh?!
Capability Chris



Creating beautiful gardens across the southeast

http://chrisodonoghue.co.uk

http://gdngrs.com Greenwich and District Narrow Gauge Railway Society

- visit http://expong.org Expo Narrow Gauge

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Thu Apr 26, 2012 10:12 am

Boghopper wrote:What a wonderful picture box Steve. Amazing what you can do with paper. I do hope the recipient realised how much work you'd put into it!


:lol: I dont think I even realised until I tried to work it out :roll: Good thing it was for a gift, rather than charging an hourly rate :wink:
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Thu May 24, 2012 11:12 am

Taking a break from the greenhouse and potting shed, time to get a bit Down and dirty, but not very :)
Same type of table, well it did come out of the same mould :wink: but this one doesnt look like it has been so well looked after.

Image

Well, judging by all the stains, whoever works here doesnt seem to take so much care :lol:
After taking a photo of this and sharing it with Gerry, we both decided that some of the staining was a bit strong, so I did dull it down a little. I now regret that as it would I think have worked well once the other items were added :roll: Oh well live and learn :wink:
Here we go with the table dressed up with a bunch of bits and pieces.

Image

It was while hunting around for bits and making some new to put on here, that I went back to an old technique to make a few gap fillers.
I guess this is the main reason for this post :lol:

Anyway, many will already be familiar wiith rolling up strips of paper to make 3D objects. Very simple to do and it is surprising what you can create with this simple technique and virtually free materials.
Ian recently used the same method to make up toilet paper rolls for his excellent model of a loo, which can be seen HERE

It just so happened that this method proved ideal to create a few more bits to help fill the table, but I did get a bit carried away :lol:

Image

Now it has to be said that these are not intended to be foreground models and dont really suit close up viewing, but for inside a building, where they are seen through a window or open doorway, are pretty convincing. They also add a nice bit of colour.

I did vary the technique a bit here to give some variety, but most are just strips of paper wrapped around a toothpic or bamboo kebab skewer.
The black for the caps of the bottles is just done with a black marker pen.
By using different coloured papers, the need for any painting is eliminated and some are further enhanced by printing some sticky labels on the computer to add even more variety.
The way I made them did evolve over a couple of weeks, so those that I started with came out much different from the later ones, which works well when grouped together like in the shelf unit below.

Image

With the exception of a couple of resin castings on the bottom shelf, everything else on these shelves is made mainly of paper, such a versatile modelling material.

One final snap of both the bench and shelves together, just need to find some stuff to put on the walls now
:wink:

Image

Hopefully this will have given some of you some ideas and encouraged you to have a play :D
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
skylon
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 134
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 4:06 pm
Interests: Light railways

Postby skylon » Thu May 24, 2012 5:14 pm

Absolutely superb. Would love to see more info on the techniques used.
Thanks,
Sam

User avatar
Glen A
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 1311
Joined: Wed May 02, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Interests: Gn15, G 1:24

Postby Glen A » Thu May 24, 2012 7:09 pm

Great assortment of interesting looking bottles and cans.

In your usual understated manner you suggest its only fit for the background. Well I'd be happy to put that in the foreground on my layout!
Its very realistic. 8)

Now can you send that neat and tidy person round to tidy my garage benches to look like that please? :lol: :lol:

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Fri May 25, 2012 9:28 am

Thanks Sam and Glen.
:lol: Yes I wish my workbench was as tidy as this, thnkfully most of this was done from an armchair, more space there :wink:

Not quite sure what to say about the technique Sam, it is quite literally a strip of paper wrapped around a toothpic.
For most of these, a strip between 7mm and 10mm wide is cut across the width of a sheet of A4 paper, which governs the height. Length will dictate the diameter, these come out about 5mm. Once that is done they can be painted, or as I did here, a printed sticky label put on. Better add that a normal sticky label wont hold around such a tight curve and needs help from a bit of PVA where it overlaps at the back.
When viewed up close, you can see the individual layers of paper which make up the top, looks a bit like they were 3D printed :D
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
Ian-IoM
Seasoned Campaigner
Seasoned Campaigner
Posts: 418
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:05 am
Location: Isle of Man
Interests: Narrow gauge & industrial railways, model making, drinking beer, eating cheese and listening to Pere Ubu.

Postby Ian-IoM » Fri May 25, 2012 1:11 pm

Nice bottles Steve, I hadn't thought of adapting the paper rolls like that but may well be giving it a go. I assume the shape of the top of the bottle is formed by pushing in the base of the roll, it reminded me of a "paper pottery" set my sister had many years ago - a quick search on google turned up a dolls house version of the same idea (scroll down a bit):
http://1inchminisbykris.blogspot.com/se ... %20pottery
Ian K
Be seeing you...

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Fri May 25, 2012 2:37 pm

Thanks Ian, that is a useful link and shows the technique far better than I could. I do have a proper quilling tool and a modified needle as shown there, but for the bottles, found the bamboo skewer worked best. In theory the hole in the middle should be the right size then to insert a short piece of the bamboo for the cap. In theory :roll:
I also vary in that I use a cheap thin superglue to set the shape. Very quick drying and has the advantage with white paper that it prevents yellowing with age.
I'm sure there are many other uses and ways the basic technique can be varied. I suspect I have only just started to explore what can be done :lol:
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
skylon
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 134
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 4:06 pm
Interests: Light railways

Postby skylon » Fri May 25, 2012 7:31 pm

Ah I see! Sorry, just me being daft.

Ingenious.
Thanks,

Sam

User avatar
Boghopper
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 6:52 pm
Location: East Sussex
Interests: Narrow gauge railway modelling

Postby Boghopper » Tue May 29, 2012 1:09 pm

What about some greasy fingerprints on the bottles Steve?? :wink:
Capability Chris



Creating beautiful gardens across the southeast

http://chrisodonoghue.co.uk

http://gdngrs.com Greenwich and District Narrow Gauge Railway Society

- visit http://expong.org Expo Narrow Gauge

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Tue May 29, 2012 4:23 pm

Boghopper wrote:What about some greasy fingerprints on the bottles Steve?? :wink:


:lol: :lol: :lol:
I'm trying hard not to get greasy prints on them. The ones that are seem to be way overscale :wink:
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
Gerry Bullock
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 3220
Joined: Wed Jul 30, 2003 8:07 pm
Location: S.E.Essex
Interests: Gn15 and O Gauge at Club.

Postby Gerry Bullock » Tue May 29, 2012 6:42 pm

Steve Bennett wrote:Taking a break from the greenhouse and potting shed, time to get a bit Down and dirty, but not very :)
Same type of table, well it did come out of the same mould :wink: but this one doesn't look like it has been so well looked after.

Image

Well, judging by all the stains, whoever works here doesn't seem to take so much care :lol:
After taking a photo of this and sharing it with Gerry, we both decided that some of the staining was a bit strong, so I did dull it down a little. I now regret that as it would I think have worked well once the other items were added :roll:


Agreed. :oops:
Might I suggest that you spill some more oil then Steve. :wink:
I've tried the bottle/can technique and they're quite easy to make. :D
So little time, so many ideas!!!!! GerryB.
http://gn15gnutt.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Tue May 29, 2012 8:51 pm

Gerry Bullock wrote:Agreed. :oops:
Might I suggest that you spill some more oil then Steve. :wink:
I've tried the bottle/can technique and they're quite easy to make. :D


:lol: Now you tell me :wink:
I think we both got fooled into thinking it was too strong on the empty table.
Having 4 of these tables on the go at the moment, i think I will play around with the stains and see what works best :)
More oil is easy, less a little more tricky :wink:
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com

User avatar
Ian-IoM
Seasoned Campaigner
Seasoned Campaigner
Posts: 418
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:05 am
Location: Isle of Man
Interests: Narrow gauge & industrial railways, model making, drinking beer, eating cheese and listening to Pere Ubu.

Postby Ian-IoM » Tue May 29, 2012 10:27 pm

I've had a play too, quick and a bit rough:
Image

Looking at the stuff on your shelves Steve and those books look very good, I may have missed something but I'd be interested in a quick pointer to how they were made :)
Ian K

Be seeing you...

User avatar
Steve Bennett
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Sat May 17, 2003 12:55 am
Location: Exeter, UK
Interests: railways?

Postby Steve Bennett » Wed May 30, 2012 9:56 pm

You got it Ian, those look very good.
I guess if I went in close enough with my bottles, you would see the layers show up just as much as on yours :)
It surprising though, once in a scene, you really dont notice that they are not perfectly smooth. You cant escape from the camera though :lol:

As for books, there are loads of covers online that can be downloaded and printed. Here are a couple of links to get you started :-

http://www.printmini.com/printables/books/lbooksh.shtml

http://gomakesomething.com/print/printmini/mini-books/

Not sure how happy you are resizing stuff for printing, but if you know what you are doing, I'd recommend altering the sizes around a bit. Just changing the same cover very slightly can give you more variety and by mixing in a few different ones, it appears more natural and looks like there are more different books than there really is.
Also by putting different thickness card in the middle, it adds even more variety.
I have found ordinary printer paper the best to use and print on best quality setting on your printer, that way the ink sinks into the paper better.
Avoid photo quality paper, it has a seperate coating on the surface, which will crack and fray if bent through 90 degrees. Unless you want damaged spines on the books of course :wink:
Steve Bennett

Sidelines

http://www.pepper7.com


Return to “Modelling Matters”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

cron