Smith's dream - a short bush tram layout

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

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PeterH
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Postby PeterH » Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:11 am

Here's the bins/chute at the wharf - for the V-skip to tip the ore into to load into the waiting barge. Weathered stripwood PVAd together.

I made a CAD drawing, then marked out the stripwood lengths while holding the strips over a printout. Here's all the bits:
Image

I made four subassemblies, gluing them together above a printout, held with blu-tak and weights:
Image

Image

Gluing the subassemblies together - hairclip heaven:
Image

Mostly done:
Image

The colour of the stripwood actually didn't change while I was making it - it is the white/grey colour just above.
Peter

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Postby martin » Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:02 am

Looks very nice! Looking forward to seeing this one unfold.
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Postby Willow Creek Traction » Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:24 pm

PeterH wrote:I made a CAD drawing, then marked out the stripwood lengths while holding the strips over a printout.
... gluing them together above a printout, held with blu-tak and weights

A variant of the old "stick and tissue" airplane method, cool.
And it made for a great finished product.
later, Forrest Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -- Nikola Tesla, July, 1934

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Postby dieselwater » Sat Jan 15, 2011 2:30 pm

Hi Peter,

The layout is coming together Gnicely. I like how you're modestly piecing it together, step by step. The bin/ chute looks smashing. Looking foward to seeing the progress :D 8)
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Postby jacko » Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:07 pm

if i used my wife's hair grips i would not live long :lol:
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Postby underworld » Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:25 pm

Looks great! 8) Interesting idea used to put it together.

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Postby Willow Creek Traction » Sat Jan 15, 2011 10:03 pm

jacko wrote:if i used my wife's hair grips i would not live long :lol:

They do seem to have issues not based in any comprehensible logic about such things.
:wink: :lol:
later, Forrest Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -- Nikola Tesla, July, 1934

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Postby PeterH » Sun Jan 16, 2011 2:26 am

I bought my own. I bought hair spray already, why not clips ?
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Postby DCRfan » Sun Jan 16, 2011 6:52 am

PeterH wrote:I bought my own. I bought hair spray already, why not clips ?


Just to set the record straight, Peter is Auckland based. We would never allow such outrageous behaviour down here in Wellington :lol: :lol:
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Postby scott b » Sun Jan 16, 2011 1:57 pm

So what I hear you saying Paul is you steal your wifes when she is out :lol: I remember also reading an article about weathering and it said to use different cosmetics for shadowing and such, with all this stuff on the workbench it could be odd if something were to happen and someone had to pack up our work rooms, well he liked models and apparently he had other more secret hobbies :roll:

So Peter back to your thread, the ore chute is really well done, I tend not to build like that but it is a good way keep everything much more to spec than my models often end up, I can`t wait to see your progress.
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Postby SOUTHPASS » Sun Jan 16, 2011 10:04 pm

G,day....Looking good Peter.
CAD drawings, you have lost me there. My plans are never more than 5 minutes ahead of what I am doing at present, don't even own a pencil :lol:

YES....1,000 post, 6 years in the making. :D
.....WARNING....
Contains images that anoraks may find disturbing.
1:24 scale 16.5mm gauge.
Yes I know it's all old and rusty, but I just model things as I see them......
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Postby PeterH » Sun Jan 16, 2011 11:11 pm

Real men didn't use CAD, but they had experience. I have a lot of trouble visualising how something like that chute all fits together, and the CAD program allows me to look at alternate ways of fitting things together without using up any stripwood. CAD also helps me things together at close to right-angles.

I'll build the other bins without CAD to see how that works out.
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Postby SOUTHPASS » Mon Jan 17, 2011 1:45 am

G,day Peter....It was just tongue in cheek. :) My daughter is a house designer for a building company and what she gets done with various programs truly amazes me. I had a go some time back and was flatout drawing a cube. :?
You know us grumpy old men, if we can't get it to work it mustn't be any good anyway. :x
.....WARNING....

Contains images that anoraks may find disturbing.

1:24 scale 16.5mm gauge.

Yes I know it's all old and rusty, but I just model things as I see them......

Have a good one....John B.

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Postby Gavin Sowry » Mon Jan 17, 2011 3:22 am

SOUTHPASS wrote: My plans are never more than 5 minutes ahead of what I am doing at present, don't even own a pencil :lol:

:D



8) 8) 8) Yes, I do my work on paper, then spend 10 times as long getting the computor to agree with my output. :!:
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Postby Willow Creek Traction » Mon Jan 17, 2011 3:35 am

SOUTHPASS wrote:YES....1,000 post, 6 years in the making. :D

And all that without a pencil. Awesome. 8) :lol:
later, Forrest Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -- Nikola Tesla, July, 1934

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Postby demaine22 » Mon Jan 17, 2011 1:31 pm

I like the look of your track plan, especially the way it flows through the scene, it's something I'd like to try one day to experiment with different modelling techniques and actual working loading/un-loading sections!
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Postby PeterH » Tue Jan 18, 2011 7:05 am

Track laid. So much sweat and cursing for just 60 cm.

I pre-curved the track by hand, which was like wrestling with a snake (though I have not actually done that yet). I would tweak the track a few times and it would stay straight; another tweak and it would suddenly bend sharply, earlier bends would change shape, and it would mysteriously change length.

I spiked it to the wood sleepers using a variety of spikes - peco track pins in places that would be covered later; or pins with the head filed down to approximate a spike to hold the track down; or pins with no head (an easy way to make a good-looking spike, I heard about this from NZ modeller Peter Ross). The latter only hold the rail from moving sideways but this is mostly what is needed.


This track will be covered later and has the big-head spikes. I fitted the two PCB sleepers before I started to hold the rails together - the holes are to add the power wires (and the saw cuts near the holes are so it stays soldered to the rail when I solder the wire on):
Image

This track, at the wharf, mostly has the spikes with filed or no heads:
Image


Spiking went easily. I followed a suggestion by Glen Anthony to thread flex track sleepers onto the top of the rails to hold them to gauge. I found this was not foolproof and would have liked to have a gauge.

Brush painting after laying was a pain - I think everyone finds that. I will grow moss on the blobs of paint on the sleepers. I found an easy way to colour the sleeper under the track (to simulate rust, oil & brake lining that falls near the track) - just touch a brush loaded with some artist's oil paint dissolved in a lot of turps to the sleeper one side of the rail. It spreads out nicely on both sides for a few mm.

It all ended up to gauge and surprisingly strong. But it was a lot of work and I would lay it differently next time.
Peter

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Postby dieselwater » Tue Jan 18, 2011 8:19 am

Good job Peter 8) The work you've put in has paid off because your track looks smashing. A good balance of industrial function and character. The bin sits well in its location. I'm enjoying watching this project evolve.
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Postby DCRfan » Tue Jan 18, 2011 10:08 am

Peter,

Your track looks fantastic. Well worth the effort. I would make the sleepers at each end of the modules PCB just in case the rails are knocked or caught on something.
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Postby Glen A » Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:59 am

Nice job Peter!

It seems like a pain at the time, but it really pays off when you look at the end result when its all finished and it looks just right!
(unlike when you save a bit of time by using standard HO track and then you curse making that decision forever because although the scenery looks great, the track looks all wrong...).

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Postby on30critter » Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:27 pm

Excellent work! I am new to this forum and there is a lot to look at. This one is looking Great. I especially like the bins/chute.

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Postby Simon Andrews » Wed Jan 19, 2011 8:55 pm

The effort spent on the track was worth it. Very effective 8)

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Postby SOUTHPASS » Wed Jan 19, 2011 9:56 pm

G,day....Coming on well Peter, hand laying track is something I have never been game to try. :)
.....WARNING....

Contains images that anoraks may find disturbing.

1:24 scale 16.5mm gauge.

Yes I know it's all old and rusty, but I just model things as I see them......

Have a good one....John B.

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Postby PeterH » Sat Jan 22, 2011 7:55 am

Thanks for the nice comments about the layout. I'm having fun.

PeterH wrote:Track laid ... But it was a lot of work and I would lay it differently next time.


I've been thinking of a fast way that would suit me and the kind of track I want to lay, and came up with this test track:
Image

The sequence is:
- prebend rail
- solder rail to PCB strips
- clean & brush paint rail
- turn track over & glue on prepainted sleepers - I used matte medium or fast epoxy; the latter is probably better, though it showed when I applied too much
- fit spikes

The spikes are only for decoration so I can use any of the gnatterbox bodge ways to represent bolt heads/rivets. In the photo the left 3 sleeper's 'spikes' are shallow black holes made with the end of a 0.5 mm pencil, and the other 'spikes' are dots of raw umber artist acrylic applied with a toothpick.

Both ways look good, even quite close, in real life - though not so good in a photo. The paint dots look marginally better, but I might use the 0.5 mm pencil ones because they are faster and easier to get all the same.
Peter

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Postby PeterH » Mon Jan 24, 2011 9:03 am

Doing the earth moving:
Image

I got swept away (pun) using the foam, and forgot to try the card strips. I shaped it with a knife first and found the result too smooth, and hard to visualise as ground. Then I picked away at it with needle pliers, which was much better. My ground goop will smooth out the lumps somewhat.
Peter


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