Using nature's bounty (wood)

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

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Moronguhl
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Using nature's bounty (wood)

Postby Moronguhl » Thu Jan 12, 2012 12:51 pm

Hi folks

Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I've googled and searched the 'box without much look - should I treat/dry wood in any way before I use it?

I picked up some twigs last night to use as vertical support logs supporting a tipping platform, but should I dry them in a low oven or treat them in some other way to avoid them rotting or degrading?

Cheers all
Christian Summers

We're gonna need a little rolling stock...and a lot of luck!

I used to have a project link here until the thread was deleted... :(

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MrPlantpot
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Postby MrPlantpot » Thu Jan 12, 2012 1:20 pm

Hi Christian,
I'm no expert, but I'd have thought just being in the warmth of your house for a few days (maybe a week) would be sufficient to dry them. Assuming they are fresh, and not already starting to rot, the'll be fine.
I've been saying for years.... "Nothing looks more like wood, than wood".
Now I can't wait to see your tipping platform. :D
My Mum calls me Steve.
1:32 on 16·5mm track. Gnot strictly minimum gauge... but it is the minimum that I'm working with !
And now... a critter in 1/24th... from scratch!

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Postby ian_g_griffiths » Thu Jan 12, 2012 2:14 pm

Hi,

Just on word of warning, don't rely on glue to attach anything to the sides of the twigs.

I did and within a week the bark seperated from the underlying wood and now I have a pile of sticks again.

The next task is to rebuild the frame drilling small holes at the joints and nailing the sticks together with sections of brass wire.

Ian

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Gerry Bullock
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Postby Gerry Bullock » Thu Jan 12, 2012 5:43 pm

I agree with Steve Christian however in view of Ian's comment first remove bark.
Personally I'd rather not use twigs from ground because how long have they been there and do you know what the wood is :?:
Could have started to rot and certain trees quickly deteriorate, Birch in particular.
Much better to cut a few from a standing tree/bush, hardly likely to cause any harm unless you're collected armfuls for resale. :twisted:
When done in the winter they don't take too long to dry out.
Having been involved, over a number of years in building bridges and Elephant proof fences, in Pound Wood using Sweet Chestnut which is an excellent building material the first operation is to remove the bark.
Leaving it on the wood only creates a hideaway for various insects including those that make a meal of the material.
So little time, so many ideas!!!!! GerryB.
http://gn15gnutt.blogspot.com/

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Postby Larry » Thu Jan 12, 2012 7:08 pm

Wood fungus is only active when the moisture content is above 20% or so.
That's really wet, so rot won't be an issue. It's nearly impossible to keep wood that wet in an indoor environment.

Most insect infestation is readily apparent, but if you want to be sure, either a soaking in Oxalic acid ( will bleach the Wood) or a trip to the oven at 100°C for enough time to heat the wood to that temperature will kill any critters.

I have had good luck with PVA injected under bark to keep it on.

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Moronguhl
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Postby Moronguhl » Thu Jan 12, 2012 8:19 pm

Seems like a bit of a minefield! How about using some dowelling that's been distressed and a few knots added with some texture putty? I'd hate for my hard work to destroy itself over the years.
Christian Summers



We're gonna need a little rolling stock...and a lot of luck!



I used to have a project link here until the thread was deleted... :(

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Simon Andrews
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Postby Simon Andrews » Fri Jan 13, 2012 1:38 am

Image

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Postby KEG » Fri Jan 13, 2012 8:38 am

I tend to put wood and roots I find outside into the oven for an hour at about 60 - 70 Degrees Celsius. Makes it about 25 - 30 % lighter.

Image[img]

The moss covered twigs on JL´s Gn15 module simply were sprayed with some clear varnish. It still looks OK a year after

Image


Have Fun

Juergen

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Moronguhl
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Postby Moronguhl » Fri Jan 13, 2012 9:43 am

Thanks for the comments guys.

Simon and Juergen - you've inspired me, if I can find wood like that suitable for 7mm scale they would be perfect! I'll have a hunt around when I'm home in daylight (which isn't during the week this time of year!
Christian Summers



We're gonna need a little rolling stock...and a lot of luck!



I used to have a project link here until the thread was deleted... :(

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DCRfan
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Postby DCRfan » Fri Jan 13, 2012 10:09 am

Why not just coat the twigs with super glue and once dry spray or paint matt to cover the glue?
Paul
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michael
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Postby michael » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:28 am

I cut fresh wood all the time, if you want clean wood peel the bark off Birch Aspen etc do it in the spring the bark comes off easily then. if you want the look with the bark do it in the winter and dry it in the oven.
Regards Michael
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Moronguhl
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Postby Moronguhl » Mon Jan 16, 2012 2:10 pm

Cheers for all your comments folks. I think i may keep it natural, dry it out for a while and then try a preservation method. I just received all my tracks parts in the post so I will get track laying and let you all know how I get on with the platform!
Christian Summers



We're gonna need a little rolling stock...and a lot of luck!



I used to have a project link here until the thread was deleted... :(


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