3D printed loco

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rue_d_etropal
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Postby rue_d_etropal » Sun Sep 07, 2014 11:05 am

it still depends if you want a polished paint effect or not.
For small models if you want that effect, opt for the finer plastic, it only costs a bit more .
Its a personal choice, but I prefer worn out locos, and the grainy plastic works better for that.
Simon Dawson
(Simon D.),
Narrow gauge Francophile interested in 1m, 60cm,50cm , 40cm and smaller gauges . Build in scales from 1/6th to 1/24th. Also 1/32nd and 1/35th using 16.5mm track to represent 50cm and 60cm gauges.
http://www.rue-d-etropal.com

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Thorness
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Postby Thorness » Sun Sep 07, 2014 4:57 pm

This is it for now:
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Just need to make a few minor adjustments, dull it down a bit and apply some light weathering.

Not sure that I am 100% happy with the lining but without a lot more practice on similar surfaces I think I will probably live with it. Practicing on big flat sheets is not the same as actually on the model!! I have great admiration for those who manage good lining on small models.
Don

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Postby Nevadablue » Sun Sep 07, 2014 6:33 pm

She's a little beauty! I'm saving all the pics. I need one of those machines.

Nice Work! Thankd for posting. :D
Ken

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Thorness
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Postby Thorness » Sun Sep 28, 2014 1:28 pm

Works-plates added, dulled down and weathered. I've also replaced that ridiculously fat brake standard.
Image
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The whole fleet:
Image

Now I think I need to extend. One loco per 11 inches of layout seems a bit excessive!


Cheers
Don

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tebee
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Postby tebee » Sun Sep 28, 2014 2:23 pm

It's looking really good. You have made a very nice job of my loco, it's good to see one finished, especially finished so well.

Tom
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Postby Boghopper » Sun Sep 28, 2014 7:18 pm

What Tom said. :wink:
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http://chrisodonoghue.co.uk
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- visit http://expong.org Expo Narrow Gauge

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Postby Thorness » Sun Sep 28, 2014 7:42 pm

I've enjoyed assembling (if that's the right word!) it. In spite of the issue with the footplate it was no more difficult than most of the kits I've assembled. The main difficulty is coping with the slightly rough surface, the more expensive material may solve that but if it is brittle that could cause other issues like breakage of the gallery rail at the back.

I still have a slight issue with several of the the products on Shapeways in that there is not much information about the extras required to complete the model, for instance wheel diameter required for the model. I appreciate that some people will enjoy the challenge but for many the uncertainty will be a turn off.

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tebee
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Postby tebee » Sun Sep 28, 2014 8:07 pm

I must admit I'm one of the bad offenders at not putting much detail on my models at Shapeways.

Partly it's the volume of stuff I do, but mostly it's that I enjoy designing but not writing and I know I'm a much better designer than salesman.

Keep meaning to go back and add more details to things, but then some new idea for something pops into my mind and I go off and start designing it.

Maybe I just have Attention Deficit Disorder........ Oh look a new loco.......

Tom
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Postby rue_d_etropal » Sun Sep 28, 2014 9:53 pm

I am almost as guilty with info on listings. One of the problems with designing for a particular chassis etc, is that the chassis gets changed or withdrawn. Better to have a model which can be adapted to various chassis. The nylon plastic drills pretty well so not too difficult to fit anything to it.
The roughness of the plastic is a drawback for some, but it suits me, as I like locos which look like they have worked hard, not been displayed in a museum.
Some models can be supplied polished, but it is a size issue.
I have mentioned it before, but you should paint/stain in a different way to the way you paint other plastic and metal. It suits my painting methods very well. I have been using a variety of water based paints for years.
Something else I have seen is very detailed models which leave little to add. Not only am I a bit lazy there, and I don't always have enough information and might get it wrong, but I feel people want to add detail and that adds interest. My computer is usually starting to grumble at the extra work then.
Simon Dawson
(Simon D.),
Narrow gauge Francophile interested in 1m, 60cm,50cm , 40cm and smaller gauges . Build in scales from 1/6th to 1/24th. Also 1/32nd and 1/35th using 16.5mm track to represent 50cm and 60cm gauges.
http://www.rue-d-etropal.com

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Postby martin » Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:07 pm

A very well painted and put together model. Teebee's Spooner has been the one 3D printed model i've really been tempted by...

but sanding the grain puts me off. Might a bit of gesso or similar help smooth it out too
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Postby rue_d_etropal » Mon Sep 29, 2014 3:27 pm

As I said, there is a polished option for some models. Not sure if the Gn15 ones are too big, but some of my 1/35 ones are small enough.
When Shapeways had a problem with their systems a few weeks ago, I noticed some of the OO9 ones I ordered came polished.I can't remember asking for polished though.They did look slightly better. There is a risk of some detail(rivets) being lost.
Simon Dawson
(Simon D.),
Narrow gauge Francophile interested in 1m, 60cm,50cm , 40cm and smaller gauges . Build in scales from 1/6th to 1/24th. Also 1/32nd and 1/35th using 16.5mm track to represent 50cm and 60cm gauges.
http://www.rue-d-etropal.com

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Postby Simon Andrews » Mon Sep 29, 2014 3:48 pm

The loco has turned out very nice. You seem to have successfully overcome the challenges / limitations of 3D loco body prints. The new loco looks at home with the rest of the stud.

Simon.
Last edited by Simon Andrews on Mon Sep 29, 2014 3:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Image

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tebee
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Postby tebee » Mon Sep 29, 2014 3:49 pm

I'm not sure the railing at the back of my Gn15 locos would survive polishing.

It does give a better finish, but also tends to round all the corners off as well as losing the rivets so I'm not that keen on it.

I find a few coats of paint smoothes it down remarkably, I also dye it first which seems the fill the pores in a little.

It all depends on what finish you want and how good your eyes are !

Tom
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Postby Thorness » Mon Sep 29, 2014 5:03 pm

It's nice to have the choice over the final appearance, I appreciate that some people want the battered and neglected look but I'm sure all real stock would have been delivered initially in a smooth if not shiny state.
Even war department stock would be in good condition unless very close to the front line. I can imagine the sargent major blowing a gasket when his locos and stock came back to the rear areas covered in mud and shrapnel marks!

Cheers.
Don

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Postby Willow Creek Traction » Mon Sep 29, 2014 6:33 pm

3D printing technology is in the early days, probably like airplanes and automobiles were in 1910s compared to where they are now. Likely the surface grain finesse will improve over time.

It wasn't that long ago (well, not that long ago to we of the 50+ crowd!) that even 3D printing as we know it was at least a Star Trek prop, if not a total castle in the sky pipe dream.

What has been interesting is this year and last watching the "would 3D printing ever be useful to the hobby?" conversations on sci-fi modeling and miniatures gaming forums when here in the model railway/railroad world it has already been utilized for a couple years.

Be merciful, eventually the rest civilization will catch up to the Gnatterbox! :lol:
later, Forrest Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -- Nikola Tesla, July, 1934

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Postby Thorness » Mon Sep 29, 2014 7:14 pm

Willow Creek Traction wrote:
It wasn't that long ago (well, not that long ago to we of the 50+ crowd!) that even 3D printing as we know it was at least a Star Trek prop, if not a total castle in the sky pipe dream.


Be merciful, eventually the rest civilization will catch up to the Gnatterbox! :lol:


It is rather sad to think that the kids today watching Star Trek will not be wowed by the idea of hand held computers (i-pads!) like we were when it first appeared.
On a similar note I recently re-watched the original Alien film and, with the benefit of hind sight, the computer with all it flashing lights seems to show a severe lack of imagination!

Cheers
Don

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rue_d_etropal
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Postby rue_d_etropal » Mon Sep 29, 2014 7:55 pm

There has been a lot of debate over WD colours, and opinion seem to be it might have started one colour, which then turned to mud colour(natural) which actual made better camouflage.
To echo Star Trek comment, without 3D printing we would not have these models at all. They are a very big step forward for the hobby, and those who want finer finish are welcome to smooth down the surface.
New materials are being introduced in 3D printing. One suggestion at Apedale from a visitor was brass , but probably for small models only.
Simon Dawson
(Simon D.),
Narrow gauge Francophile interested in 1m, 60cm,50cm , 40cm and smaller gauges . Build in scales from 1/6th to 1/24th. Also 1/32nd and 1/35th using 16.5mm track to represent 50cm and 60cm gauges.
http://www.rue-d-etropal.com

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Thorness
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Re: 3D printed loco

Postby Thorness » Tue Jan 13, 2015 10:01 pm

I've added some extra lining and a coal bucket:
Image

This was built on a new Smokey Joe chassis and is a much smoother and quieter runner than the other two locos that were built on second-hand ones!
Don

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R/C is the way to go.


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