Is there a Mathematical Formula for Widening Gauge on Tight Curves ?

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underworld
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Is there a Mathematical Formula for Widening Gauge on Tight Curves ?

Postby underworld » Mon Apr 30, 2018 3:08 am

Is there a Mathematical Formula for Widening Gauge on Tight Curves... or at least some way of rough figuring how much to widen the gauge on a tight curve ?
I have an LGB 20140 Feldbahn Loco that I'm in the process of upscaling to 7/8ths. It will be 45mm track, and the wheelbase of the 20140 is about 45mm. I want to build a small layout that can easily be transported in the seat of a smaller Car. I want to use it to attract more new people to the hobby, and to Show people that large scale can be done indoors, even with a small amount of space
8)

Thanks !
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chris stockdale
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Re: Is there a Mathematical Formula for Widening Gauge on Tight Curves ?

Postby chris stockdale » Mon Apr 30, 2018 6:48 am

I know that 8" (yes, really) has been used with, I think about 1.5mm gauge widening. I don't know of a formula

1. Since you'd have to make your own track then try a 1mm, then a 1.5 etc

But...

2. All the LGB stuff will go round their R1 2' radius anyway - and that's a fairly small radius for a large scale piece of kit. There's a zillion people using LGB already, do you need to push the radius boundaries any further? After all, to encourage those seeing a demo you want to be able to say, 'And this runs on standard track straight from the shop, rather than, 'And you'll have to make your own track.' Make it easy for them to think: 'Ooh, I could do that'. That's what draws them in.

Cheers,

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Re: Is there a Mathematical Formula for Widening Gauge on Tight Curves ?

Postby southpier » Tue May 08, 2018 9:25 am

I have to agree with #2.

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Re: Is there a Mathematical Formula for Widening Gauge on Tight Curves ?

Postby tebee » Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:45 am

Here is a website that tells you how to calculate what will go round what curves - designed for model engineers, but same principles apply

http://www.smex.net.au/reference/MinRadius02.php

Probably far too technical for most of us !
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