Gnutley Grange, another pizza saga and the techniques used.

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Re: Another Grass Clumps Update

Postby DCRfan » Mon Aug 20, 2012 9:23 am

Steve Bennett wrote: :lol: Sorry Paul, I'm not sure how to go about making them in 1:35th, not a scale I have worked in for many years.
Perhaps some of the military modelling forums will be able to help :lol:


But they would only tell me how to make military grass clumps. I want trackside grass :lol: :lol: :lol:

To make the longer grass stand up have you tried turning the clumps upside down once the grass is in the glue?
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Re: Another Grass Clumps Update

Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Aug 20, 2012 9:46 am

DCRfan wrote:To make the longer grass stand up have you tried turning the clumps upside down once the grass is in the glue?


:idea: I need to move to the southern hemisphere, that should do it :lol:
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Postby Artizen » Mon Aug 20, 2012 10:38 am

I've never thought of turning my clumps upside down!
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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Aug 20, 2012 12:23 pm

Artizen wrote:I've never thought of turning my clumps upside down!


:lol: You really havent lived Ian, where is your sense of adventure :lol:
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Postby Gerry Bullock » Mon Aug 20, 2012 12:33 pm

Steve Bennett wrote:
Artizen wrote:I've never thought of turning my clumps upside down!


:lol: You really havent lived Ian, where is your sense of adventure :lol:


Gromit's going to try it later however he thinks his grass magnet might be a better way. :twisted:
So little time, so many ideas!!!!! GerryB.
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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:23 pm

Gerry Bullock wrote:Gromit's going to try it later however he thinks his grass magnet might be a better way. :twisted:


:? Now I'm nervous :lol:
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Postby Simon Andrews » Mon Aug 20, 2012 4:28 pm

Interesting update Steve, may splash out on a homemade grass applicator myself.

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Postby MT Hopper » Mon Aug 20, 2012 6:53 pm

A makeup eyeliner brush would do to brush the grass into an upright position after the glue gets a grip.

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Re: Another Grass Clumps Update

Postby Glen A » Mon Aug 20, 2012 7:13 pm

Steve Bennett wrote:
Image



Hi Steve.

Is this just an electric fly swat with a strainer mounted in it?
And its still running on batteries?
And no other special power circuits?
Where does that lead get wired to?

The guys locally have been wiring them up to big photocopier transformers and special high voltage circuits or something, (and then selling them for $100+ ) which is what has put me off until now.

If its that simple to do I might have a go at making one :roll: ( :twisted: even though the North Pole doesn't have any grass).

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Re: Another Grass Clumps Update

Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Aug 20, 2012 8:27 pm

Glen A wrote:Is this just an electric fly swat with a strainer mounted in it?
And its still running on batteries?
And no other special power circuits?
Where does that lead get wired to?

If its that simple to do I might have a go at making one :roll: ( :twisted: even though the North Pole doesn't have any grass).


Well I have to confess I bought it ready converted, so cant take any credit for it's construction. I did research how to do it, but there is a guy here in the UK who makes them and sells on ebay very cheaply, so I figured It better to buy one ready done.

To answer your questions though, yes, yes and yes for the first 3.
As for the wire, it seems it is just an extension to one of the originals in the fly swat and goes to the ground to complete the electro static circuit.

This video and the following 2 shows the whole process in more detail than I could explain:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAEmcqc-yIc
The yellow part on mine is part of the original fly swat and makes a neater job than the one in the video, it is filled with hot glue by the look of it and holds the stem of the strainer very firmly.

I have been running mine on rechargeable AA batteries, which only give 1.2Volts, so maybe I should have a go with some standard AA's to see if it makes any difference :?:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Aug 20, 2012 8:47 pm

MT Hopper wrote:A makeup eyeliner brush would do to brush the grass into an upright position after the glue gets a grip.


Hmmmm, not used eyeliner since the 1970's when David Bowie was a big influence and I was too young to know any better :lol:

More seriously though, it probably would improve them, but would take a lot longer than it takes to produce the clumps. To give an idea of how quick this goes, now that I have had a bit of practice, in a 15 to 20 minute session, I produce approximately 100-150 individual clumps. Brushing each one individually to shape it, i'm sure would take a lot longer and probably get tedious pretty soon into it. Once on a diorama or layout, I'm not so sure you would be able to see much difference, so I think I will leave that for someone else to experiment with :lol:
Interesting idea though.
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Postby Adrian » Tue Aug 21, 2012 12:07 am

G'day Glen

I've had a go at two "grass-putter-on-er's"

The first used a TV EHT transformer and although it worked and made the grass stand up really well I would NOT recommend anybody going down that particular path as the voltages and powers can kill :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
Image
Use only at your own risk !!!!

However the second used a negative ion generator from a local supplier.
http://secure.oatleyelectronics.com//pr ... 537fce8350
This was mounted in a plastic tube together with a 9v battery and works reasonably well and is a lot safer :!:

Both these devices were made before the "fly-swat" was available, which is the path which I would follow if I started now.

One story that I heard of, about a modeler from Queensland, was to produce his high voltages by using a lathe to drive a car distributor which was wired to a 12 volt car battery and coil. Not very portable but it worked well, cost him nothing (because he had all the bits) and had the advantage that another modeler couldn't 'borrow' and then forget to return it :D :D

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Postby Artizen » Tue Aug 21, 2012 3:07 am

I have the Oatley generator and I have just been scrounging boxes or high-density plastic tubes to hide it in.

My thinking is to separate the generator/battery box from the applicator by using longer leads and having the handle positioned vertically over the metal mesh to allow me to do jobs between trees etc. The box containing all the electrickery would also incorporate one quick-disconnect speaker jack to keep the built-up charge from grounding through the mesh when not in use.

Looking forward to seeing what 12kV does to nylon fibres!!! And that's only running 9V!!!!
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Postby Steve Bennett » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:34 am

All ths electrickery sound dangerous, think I will stick with the fly swat, only had 2 shocks from it so far :lol: One was intentional and the second an accident, but it reminded me to always ground it after use :roll:

If I was doing large layouts though, I might have gone for one of THESE
Not sure everybody will be able to see that, it is an Ebay UK link, if not try searching # 270959044171
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sat Sep 01, 2012 3:53 pm

Think I had better make this a quick post, I'm expecting the guys in white coats to be knocking on the door any moment :lol:
This all originated from a simple question from Ian on how to represent a Cow Parsley plant, on THIS thread.
Well being Gnuts, i thought it would be a nice challenge, so here is the result:

Image

It's not finished yet and I'm not sure it will be, but it was fun trying to get close to the appearance :roll:

I will picture the items used below, for anybody that might be mad enough to try something similar, though I think I might be alone :lol:
The stem is from a piece of Sea Moss, Sea Foam, Forest in a Box, or whatever name it might go by where you are. It's a dried plant often used to make trees in the smaller scales.
Add to this a few punched leaves from a paper punch which I believe is supposed to be an Oak leaf.
Finally the flower heads. These are from a small Yarrow plant which grows alongside the roads around here. It's only about 9inches high, but even looks like a miniature version of cow parsley to start with.
These I have had drying for a couple of months after standing them in dilute PVA for a few days to see if it would preserve them. Seems to be working so far, though I will probably need to add some touches of paint to the flowers after a while.
OK, here is the pic:

Image

The tools used may be fairly obvious. A pair of fine scissors for trimming, fine tipped tweezers as my fingers are too big, plus of course an old ballpoint pen :?: :?: :?:
The ballpoint is used in conjunction with the round object, which is a kids pencil eraser, for shaping the leaves.
One final shot going in closer to show the leaves and the flower heads.

Image

The flower heads are not stuck on the plant yet, i need to paint the stem and leaves to match a bit better, then I will start gluing the flower heads on.
OK, I hear a knock on the door, so I'm going to hide :wink:
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