Chalk Mine Extension

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michael
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Chalk Mine Extension

Postby michael » Fri Jan 27, 2006 8:45 pm

Philip of Sussex better known as Uncle Philip to Bertrand purchased a section of land ajoining the existing Chalk Mine the story of which was related some time ago.
Mining was always something that Philip wanted to get into and this was his opportunity.
Being resourceful and cheap Philip purchased an old run down wooden building that he intended to use as a temporary shed in which to house Mercury while he built a more appropriate one that would include a workshop as well.
He intended to locate this next to the escarpment close to one of the mine entrances, so that when the proper shed was built this one could be taken over by the workers of the mine.

This is the rational for what follows and I'm sticking to it.

Image

This is the extension so far it used up a few scraps of pink insulation foam that was waiting for an excuse to be used. The layout will be veiwable from all sides with an underground section as well, by using the hill as a visual block one side will be as if looking at a steep cutting, two sides give the views of the shed and entry to the mine and the last side shows the underground portion.

The loco and skips will be able to run on the continuous loop with the option of the loco being parked in the shed occasionally.

The new(old) shed was cut and pasted from this. which was a 1/24 scale diorama that I started after seeing some of Joel Crea's modelwork 20 years ago.

It was a bit tricky cutting it up as the wood was very dry and the paint brittle, but I think it will work out ok in the end.

Image

There are a few pictures of the transition here
http://photobucket.com/albums/y169/my30mm/chalk%20mine%20extension/?sc=5

I will be putting some more work into the shed and laying the track in the next little while so will add more info as it comes along.
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Postby ian holmes » Fri Jan 27, 2006 11:09 pm

Whew! Something you can't blame me for :lol:
Seriously Michael, I'm looking forward to following the progress. Though I'm still waiting for Macton to be finished. Lord knows how they manage to turn out so many loco's in a half-finished works building :wink:

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Postby Peter » Fri Jan 27, 2006 11:48 pm

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Last edited by Peter on Fri Jan 27, 2006 11:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Peter » Fri Jan 27, 2006 11:50 pm

Dang it, now I HAVE to work on my layout. I'm being left behind! Seriously, Micheal, I'm looking foward to seeing yet another great project from you. Your shovel project got me to go and get some brass stock to use on Sammy, and we'll have to see what "hmm, I should try that" idea you show next :D
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Postby michael » Fri Jan 27, 2006 11:50 pm

A bit edgy are we Ian :P

I Decided that "Frocks" was the way to go again, so here is the first couple of hours worth of being up to my elbows in slippery plaster.

I must say that Mario did come up with a neat way to produce scenery quickly. Once I get things sorted the top most portion will have a more rural English countyside nature to it. (Yeh see if you can pull that off he said thinking to himself)

Image

a bit later...


Image

Image

This stuff is so light and quick it is such a great way to get a lot of landscape with little effort.

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Postby michael » Sat Jan 28, 2006 4:53 am

A bit more work on the deck and the underground frocks.


Image

Image

There is a new gallery of the chalk mine here
http://photobucket.com/albums/y169/my30mm/chalk%20mine%20extension/?sc=1&multi=5

I will need to wait a few days now for the drywall plaster that is used to soak the foam rocks in dries hard. then i can go in and work in some thicker plaster where it is needed, also to start adding some modeled details into the landscape.

I would guess that the total time in this project not counting the earlier work on the building years back to be around 8 hours.

Michael
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sat Jan 28, 2006 11:33 am

Crikey, that is going together quick :) I see the lure of a continuous run has got to you, I dont think you will regret it. Sitting down and relaxing while you watch your trains run is a great experience. Good to see that old building getting recycled Michael, it's going to make a great loco shed.
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Postby DCRfan » Sat Jan 28, 2006 12:44 pm

Michael,

Thanks for reminding me about "Frocks". The technique is just what I'm after.
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Postby Racing Hippo » Sat Jan 28, 2006 1:29 pm

DCRfan wrote:Thanks for reminding me about "Frocks". The technique is just what I'm after.


Ditto!
Part of my planned layout is a mine, sited under the rest of the layout. I'd put the topic "how to create rock-like walls" onto the "worry about it later" pile, but now I have the answer!
Oh, and they might just feature a Special Guest embedded in them..... :D

I believe the original description of the technique was this one.

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what a pretty frock you have there

Postby scott b » Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:04 pm

Well I must have missed the orignal post on that one. What a good idea, I can use that foam the Bachmann goodies come packed in.
Has anyone used this method for structures or large cut stone walls?
Thanks for pointing that out.

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Postby michael » Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:48 pm

Thanks for reposting the link to Marios site John, I had lost it during all my computer problems around christmastime. but I remebered the technique.

it really is a great way to build scenery, I know that the traditional method of weaving paper strips over card formers is still probably an easier way to produce that soft rolling rural landscape that I mentioned earlier, but I might be able to still get that effect on the topmost part with a little bit of fiddling,
this is basically what I am after,
http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-047947-thewhitecliffs-langdon_cliffs-gallery_picture


with the lower part looking like this

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-059491-thewhitecliffs-cliffs_cu-gallery_picture

And steve yes I must admit that The idea of being able to let the loco run for a bit does appeal to me. It makes a pleasing contrast to all the work of shunting back and forth.

Scott you have the right Idea use up any old foam for this sort of work, according to Mario old furniture foam is one of the best and I went around to some upholsterers and begged for the rubish that they strip out of old stuff that they are recovering, buying it new is just way too expensive.

I find that tearing it up is the hardest part of the whole exercise.

regards Michael
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Postby michael » Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:56 pm

Sott I forgot to comment on your question, I havent tried it but if you were to get some of the thinner sheets of packing foam say 1/4 insh thick and uset some scissors to cut up a few strips of varying widths. lay out the walls with some card and balsa strips for the frames and lintels, then fill in the spaces around with courses of stones that you could tear off the cut strips. and do a random type wall.

Give it a go and show us the results, I bet it would work even with a some very small amounts of plaster of paris if working with small sections and it would dry harder more quickly.

regards Michael
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Postby michael » Tue Feb 28, 2006 5:15 am

Well the frocks have had enough time to dry and I wanted to take a break from hammering copper on Louisa, so today I gave the chalk mine extension a second coat of plaster with some overlay of some scrap green velvet that I salvaged from some commercial theatre curtains I wanted to fill in some of the telltale holes that make using the frocks look a bit like plaster covered foam :lol: . The very top will eventually get some grass and perhaps a couple of sheep.


Image

I coated both sides of the velvet and pasted it onto the top of the layout, didn't we use terry cloth once apon a time for landscape?

I digress :)

I also laid some track in the most heinous way I slathered yes slathered the base with muddy plaster and just sunk the track into it :!: .

I'll figure out the points and the rest of the connections later. I just wanted to join the bodgers! you with your secret bodging handshakes "are you trying to tell us that this is a slaughterhouse? well yes but its not just any slaughterhouse" :wink: and get on with it. maybe I'll pay for it later but some of the track is down.

Image

It turns out that Phillip (of Sussex) wanted (pretty boy) Bertrand to get some of the debris out of the workings and so gave him the OK to take Mercury in with a couple of skips to clean up the line.

Image

Well it does take my mind off other more pressing stuff.

regards michael
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Postby Sir Briand » Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:52 pm

Neat stuff Michael. Too bad I won't be able to see it when we pass your way. Looking forward to the Saturday morning meet though. Don't forget to check the ETA before leaving home. Back in Feb 2003 we were 4 hours late into Edmonton. In 48 hours we will be on board and waiting to depart Toronto. Back home on the 14th by which time GnATTERbox withdrawal symptoms could be severe. :cry:

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Postby Steve Bennett » Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:21 pm

Thats quite some snowscape Michael :) are you making up for the lack of it outside this year :) . I hope you dont regret the haste of laying the track and find a way to vonnect up the turnouts :)
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Postby michael » Tue Feb 28, 2006 4:35 pm

Steve, I am thinking of using some standard #4 points that will be converted to stub switches, When I was in Calgary at the Supertrain show I saw an "n" scale layout that the chap had converted all his points to stub action they worked very well. So I think they might not be too difficult to splice in.

Yes it does look a little snowy at the moment, it will soon get the green topping, I think I might go for a bit of the fake fur treatment that Scott used.

Brian Perhaps I will put the layout in the back of the van there might possibly be an opportunity to see it, it is certainly light and rigid, The train station in edmonton runs along side the airport road and there is only a low chain link fence between the passenger cars and the sidewalk. If I can park on the road it will be easy, but the parking lot is pretty accessible. and lets face it the Edmonton train station isnt exactly the busiest place in the world :lol: :lol: one or two trains a day I think.

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Postby AndyA » Wed Mar 01, 2006 8:48 am

Michael said...

I also laid some track in the most heinous way I slathered yes slathered the base with muddy plaster and just sunk the track into it.

I'll figure out the points and the rest of the connections later. I just wanted to join the bodgers! you with your secret bodging handshakes "are you trying to tell us that this is a slaughterhouse? well yes but its not just any slaughterhouse" and get on with it. maybe I'll pay for it later but some of the track is down.


Close, Michael, but you've been corrupted by that MR project into letting the stuff dry first.

In truth, chopping the stuff up, drilling holes and then re-covering it works well. I look forward to seing your stub point conversion. What did the guy do? I guess I'd start by chopping the point/switch off where the moving blades start and replacing that length with a pair of moveable rails?

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Postby michael » Wed Mar 01, 2006 3:06 pm

Andy When I went back and looked at the few scrap sets of points that I have it turned out that they were all the wrong hand :(
There was another problem and it is that the curve right where I want to put the points is a bit tighter than the #4 turnout anyway.

Image

I will do a quick photo essay on converting a standard set of points though because they did appear to blend in and really worked well.


As far as my own situation goes I will cut out the sections of rail and built the point to fit, I can see why doing the track in a more traditional way has its bennetfits ....I mean benefits :lol: :lol:

Image

The one benefit that I noticed with the pink foam is being abble to hold the flextrack in place by just pushing in some 1/2" staples by hand like this

Image

The space between the pencil lines is where the stub rails will go.
I might have to do a little blasting to widen the gap round this curve as well, that of course id the beauty of the frocks, just get in there with a sharp craft knife and scissors.


Michael
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Postby Steve Bennett » Wed Mar 01, 2006 3:55 pm

[quote="michael"]As far as my own situation goes I will cut out the sections of rail and built the point to fit, I can see why doing the track in a more traditional way has its bennetfits ....I mean benefits :lol: :lol: /quote]

:lol: :lol: :lol: I have to say the track looks good all buried in like that, I'm waiting with interest to see how you tackle the turnouts, never too old to learn new tricks :)
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Postby michael » Sun Mar 05, 2006 2:59 am

I managed to get a good chunk of the points built today, I would not recommend this method unless it is absolutly necessary to fit into an existing layout.

This felt like one of those I will make this work no matter what sort of jobs.

The first step was to use a dremel tool to cut the rails.

Image


I cut up some flex track to give me some single rail sections to work with.

These were stuck down with 5 minute epoxy.


Image


I used some weights to hold the loose rails in place these inside rails were glued onto some 10 thou spacers to get the rail to the right height.



Image


Image

After a little soldering and clean up I added the check rails, these were also glued down with 5 minute epoxy.

Image


This crazy method obviously is only useful if the track is going to be buried. The whole lot was then coated with plaster.

Image


And a little cleaning befor. letting this part set up. I ran a small ste of wheels over to make sure most of the rails were clean.


Image

The next part will be to tackle the stub rails, But having got this far I am hoping that they don't give me too much trouble.

regards Michael
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Postby AndyA » Sun Mar 05, 2006 9:17 am

There you go, Michael. You see this using five-minute epoxy to glue track together isn't so hard after all. :)

Did you solder the V in situ? I'd be interested in knowing how that was done, just as I'm looking forward to seeing how you tackle the stub rails.

Actually, this is bodging worthy of the original meaning: a seriously class result from an unconventional approach.

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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Mar 05, 2006 10:47 am

Yes I think you can now safely use the title of Bodger, you have earned that status :) Hopefully the stub rails wont give you too many problems. I dont think that this is a technique to include in the beginners guide to Gn15 :) Though I'm sure once done it will work OK.
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Bodger

Postby Catweasel » Sun Mar 05, 2006 12:41 pm

May I suggest the title of "Artful Bodger"? And how about a comp. to see who can come up with the best bodge of the year.
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Postby michael » Sun Mar 05, 2006 2:25 pm

Andy wrote
Did you solder the V in situ? I'd be interested in knowing how that was done, just as I'm looking forward to seeing how you tackle the stub rails.


Andy the rails were indeed soldered in situ, I was a bit concerned at the time that I might have some trouble, But the rails were already in the correct positions being held in place with the epoxy. I had tried to keep the epoxy away from the area that was going to be soldered. The one wing rail was soldered because the curved rail was left in place, and only enough was chopped out to form the gap for the crossing. The solder really only added the small transition.

The V was filed and so was pretty clean and only needed a light touch with a hot iron loaded with solder I had put a bit of paste flux on the joint with a toothpick.

here is a shot before I cleaned the joint up

Image

There was just a little browning on epoxy, but I was careful not to linger with the iron.

regards Michael
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Postby scott b » Sun Mar 05, 2006 2:31 pm

5 min epoxy, I love you. Is that stuff not the greatest. Other than detail work I go through boatloads of the stuff, I have not figured out where to buy it in bulk yet so it is a bit pricey.
Catweasel I think we have seen the best bodge of the year and it`s only Smarch. Watching Micheal do this is like watching a shot on net when the goaly is down and on the opposite side of the net and the forward takes a shot and the play is over and the forward is dancing around knowing he scored but everyone else is looking for the puck and the goalies glove opens revealing the puck and the crowd as one says "what the *^&%"
that is what watching Micheals work does to me. good work Micheal.
Sorry for the hockey analogy but it`s in the blood.

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